Guy Family Reunion 2024
Our Story...

Children of Baldy Guy
 

 

 

"STRONG ROOTS MAKES STRONG BRANCHES"


OUR STORY
******************

ALL ABOUT THE GUYS


Written By:
The late Willie C. Guy-Hinton

5th Generation Descendant
of
Millie Guy


&

Researched By:
Darin K. (Pookie) Leake Sr.

7th Generation Descendant
of

Millie Guy


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OUR HERITAGE
************************
Today we celebrate Our Heritage, in remembrance of who and whose we are. GOD created the Garden of Eden and the dawn of humankind in our Motherland, Africa. We are noble creations of our Lord GOD. We have taught, produced, shared and cared. Many of our ancestors died during the unthinkable Middle Passage Voyage and many of those who arrived to these shores managed to withstand the further cruelties of American Chattel Slavery with the help of GOD whom they knew in very personal ways. They were creative and smart. They took part of their African heritage and merged it with what they learned from life in America and produced a way of life that we still follow and celebrate today.

The Legacy of our ancestors has been creativity, ingenuity, and survival against every odd and our GOD-Centerness.  We remember and honor the many that have gone before us. We salute those who have given and even sacrificed themselves for the sake of justice and liberty in this land. We celebrate the life-giving heritage of our individual families and our collective families. We celebrate, worship and honor the GOD who continue to be Our Great Source of Help, Courage and Hope.

 
We do not go where the path leads,
We go instead where there is no path and leave a trail


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OUR PRAYER
*********************
GOD of Eternal love
We thank you for the sense of belonging
and the maturing we enjoy from family connection
We learn to love, to share and care
to be strong and gentle, to give and to receive
Forgive us when we are self focused
to the exclusion of one each other's good
Forgive us when we are short of courtesy
consideration and kindness.
May our love be patient, thoughful and generous
Help us to carry each others burdens
and share every goodness, always reflecting your love.
Give us strength to serve each other
wisdom to respect our differences
and grace to offer words and deeds
that build us up together in your righteousness
Amen



OUR FAMILY
*********************

God made us a family. We need each other. We love
one another and forgive one another. We work together
and play together. We worship together and use GOD's
Word together. Together we grow in Christ and learn
to love all men. Together we serve our GOD and seek
to
know His will. These are our hopes and ideals.
Lord, we ask for your grace to attain the.
Amen


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THE BROKEN CHAIN
*********************************

IN LOVING MEMORY OF OUR DECEASED LOVE ONES

We did not know that morning that
GOD was going to call your name
In life we loved you dearly, in death we do the same.
It broke our hearts to lose you, you did not go alone;
for part of us went with you, the day GOD called you home.
You left us peaceful memories, your love is still our guide
and though we cannot see you, your are always at our side.
Our Family Chain is broken and nothing seems the same;
but as GOD calls us one by one
the Chain will link again.


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INTRODUCTION
*************************
The following is an attempt to tell our story; we are attempting to try for the first time to tell All About The Guys. So, if you find omissions or errors please forgive and bring it to our attention. For the time being, our story begins in 1810. As the years go by and more information becomes available, we will be able to go back further and develop a more comprehensive documentary of our forefathers, their families and the lives they lived.

As part of this presentation, we have included copies of documents that show some of the aspects of the lives our ancestors lived. We have also included depositions and affidavits given by and on behalf of our beloved forefathers which reflect their openness of character that allowed them to establish and maintain deep and lasting friendships. Baldy's and Margaret's friends traveled far distances and on numerous occasions to assist them as they went about the business of securing the necessary means to support themselves and their families. Please read through the repetitions and take from them the pearls of Family History that they contain.

I am sure these friends and family members never dreamed that we would be looking to them some (111) one hundred and eleven years later to introduce us to Baldy Guy and (95) ninety five years later to tell us all about our Maternal Great-Grandmother and her family. We also thank the United States of America Department of the Interior for storing these records for us until we could come looking for them via the Internet.

Because many of the depositions and affidavits are written in long hand, I have transcribed them for easier reading but the originals are available because they give so much more of a sense of character than just the mere typed words. One of the things that struck me was that their signatures were almost always represented by an "X" because many of them could not read or write. Indeed, it was against the law to teach slaves to read or write. Yet they would learn to read and write and would see to it that their children and grandchildren would get an education. Our present family represents members of all the professions and includes, but is not limited to: Parents, Grandparents, Preachers, Presiding Elders, Professors, Poets, Inventors, Men and Women of Medicine, Intellectual Giants, Musicians, Freedom Fighters, Corporate Executives, Banking Professionals, Government Employees as well as self-employed Entrepreneurs.

We are still looking for pictures of Millie Guy, Baldy Guy, Margaret Norton-Guy and George Guy. We want to put a face to the legacies that they left behind. In the meantime, to love and believe in the history of our family you must look at them through the eyes of your heart.

 
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GENERATION ONE
MILLIE GUY

********************
Millie Guy (1810-1878)

 
Our story begins in Raleigh, North Carolina in 1810 with the birth of a slave girl named Millie. There is no information available on her or her parents, the circumstances of her birth or the person who owned her when she was born which is how her last name would have been determined, if indeed, she used a last name. It was the custom that slaves were given the Last / surname of their owners.

The next time we find a record of Millie is in 1841 and she has been relocated to Tuscumbia, Alabama. She is about thirty one (31) years old and has given birth to our Great-Grandfather Baldy Guy. Millie also had another son George Guy born in 1845. A slave from Virginia fathered Millie's sons. His name is not recorded in any of the records searched to date. Albert Guy was the slave master who owned Millie and her sons. If Millie had other children it would have to be assumed that they were born and sold before she came to live in Alabama. Millie and her sons lived as a family unit until May of 1863 when both of her sons ran away to Corinth, Mississippi and enlisted in the Union Army for a term of three (3) years. They remained in the army until December 31, 1865 when the Civil War ended. The South had surrendered and all the slaves were freed.

In 1866 Millie settled near Nesbit, Mississippi and became a cook for Minnie D. Rutland. Her sons lived a short time in Memphis, Tennessee but soon moved to the same community as Millie. In 1868 Baldy began working on the same farm where his mother was the cook.

On January 30, 1869, Millie's oldest son Baldy married Margaret Norton and on November 14th of that same year her first grandchild Earnton Guy Sr. was born.  On January 15, 1870 her youngest son George married Alice Grant Winters. Millie did not live on her employer's farm, she lived with her youngest son George and his wife Alice, a fact verified by the 1870 Census. Soon both sons were supplying Millie with grandchildren on a regular basis. Millie cooked for Minnie Rutland until 1878 and it is believed that she died shortly thereafter. Minnie Rutland gave a deposition on January 15, 1912 in which she referred to Millie as "splendid". We have been unable to locate her final resting-place but are continuing to search. When Millie died it marked the end of Generation One as far as we have been able to determine. It she had siblings they were never mentioned.

 
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The 1st home of Dr. Joseph Albert Guy in Tuscumbia, Alabama in 1822.
The 1st home of Dr. Joseph Albert Guy in Tuscumbia, Alabama in 1822.
Millie lived the first (55) fifty-five years of her life as a slave. Slavery robbed her of her liberty and her very identity. Before she died she was able to see her two sons living free, legally married and enjoying upstanding honorable lives. She also was able to see seven of her eighteen grandchildren born free and given the last names of their fathers.

Although, Guy was their slave name, Millie and her sons chose to keep and use that name so as to reflect the family structure they would build and that continues to be built until this very day. We do not know at this time how many generations of Millie's family were born and sold in the United States before she was born. Since the first thing the slave owners did was strip the slaves of their name and identity, retrieving their African name was not an option available to them. They kept the GUY name and Millie kept her family together and she is the reason we are able to come together to celebrate (197) one hundred and ninety seven years and (9) Nine Generations of FAMILY STAYING CONNECTED.

Slavery was a process of obliteration of a whole people, but we are here to let the world and the powers that be know that they failed. Millions of children disappeared into the Slave Trade never to be seen or heard from again. Our ancestors were able to remain together to the extent needed to stay connected.

 
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Baldy Guy (1841-1911) & George Guy (1845-1928)
Baldy Guy (1841-1911) & George Guy (1845-1928)
GENERATION TWO
CHILDREN OF MILLIE GUY
**********************
Baldy Guy (1841-1911)
and
George Guy (1845-1928)

Both members of Generation Two were Civil War Veterans. According to Legacy Magazine, this is the uniform that the United States Colored Volunteer Infantry wore in 1865. We are still looking for pictures of our GUYS, so if you see pictures like this anywhere in your family, please pass them on.
 
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BALDY GUY
(1841-1911)

**************
Baldy Guy was born a slave in 1841 in Tuscumbia, Alabama. He lived and worked for his owner along with his mother Millie Guy and his younger brother George Guy. His father was a slave born in Virginia. Albert Guy owned Millie, Baldy and George Guy and it appears that the three of them lived on the Guy Farm as a family unit until 1863. Baldy was a Private in the Original Company B 55th Regiment of the United States Colored Volunteer Infantry AD. George was in the same Regiment and Infantry unit but was in Original Company H. Baldy was enrolled in Captain Ewing's Company B 1st Alabama Infantry AD. He was wounded in battle on June 10, 1864 near Guntown, Mississippi. Baldy

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. In addition to freeing slaves in the Confederate Territory, it stated that African Americans would be eligible to join the Union Army. Just a mere four months after the proclamation, Baldy and his brother George ran off with the Union soldiers to Corinth, Mississippi. Both enlisted in the Union Army on May 18, 1863 for a three-year term. Baldy was a Private in the Original  Company B 55th Regiment of the United States Colored Volunteer Infantry. George served in the same Regiment and Infantry Unit as Baldy but was in Original Company H. Baldy was enrolled in Captain Ewing's Company B 1st Alabama Infantry AD. He was wounded in the Battle of Guntown on June 10, 1864 near Guntown, Mississippi. Baldy suffered a gunshot wound in the left  shoulder, but he remained on active duty until  he was honorably discharged on December 31, 1865 when the Civil War ended. Baldy's Enlistment Form and his Muster Out / Separation Form are shown on pages 14-a and 14-b.

On December 31, 1865, the South surrendered. The Civil War was over. Slavery in the United States of America had come to an end. Baldy collected his final Military Pay, all $33.31 of it and he and his brother George headed to Memphis, Tennessee.They lived in and around Memphis for about two years to test their new found freedom status and then they settled near Nesbit, Mississippi where their mother Millie Guy was living. Many slaves were not able to enjoy  their freedom until two years later in places like Texas. They heard about freedom only as a rumor and did not act on it. But Baldy and George were there in the thick of things and were able to immediately act on their new status. Baldy found work on a farm owned by the Rutland Family and he would live and work there for the next (38) thirty-eight years. His mother Millie was the cook on the same farm.

On January 30, 1869, Baldy married Margaret Baker Norton (1851-1921) , a former slave who was born in Warren County, Georgia.  He brought her to live on the Rutland Farm. A copy of the Certification of their Marriage is shown on page 14-c. Herbert Meredith, Pastor of Haliburton Church performed the ceremony. The wedding was a festive affair. It was held in the home of Margaret's employer, Mr.  and Mrs. Tom Nesbit and attended by family and friends. Margaret's mother Mary Anne Norton (1828-) and Margaret's sister Annettie (Net) Norton-Moseley (1846-) were there as well as Baldy's good friend Henderson Price. Annettie cooked the Wedding Supper.

On November 14, 1869, Baldy and Margaret welcomed their first born son and the first member of the 3rd Generation in the Guy Family. They named him Earnton. Margaret and Baldy would eventually have a total of (10) ten children. All of their children married and settled in Plum Point, Mississippi, later named Horn Lake, Mississippi and named  Southaven, Mississippi.

 
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Their children were mostly farmers and carpenters. Most of them united with either Phoenix Chapel AME Church or New Hope Baptist Church both in Desoto County, Mississippi.

They all remained in the area until their death with the exception of Ruben Guy and Mary Guy-Howard. Ruben eventually settled in Southern Illinois where he brought a farm and lived there until his death on December 7, 1946. Mary made her home in Edmondson, Arkansas until her death in 1953.

The children of Baldy and Margaret are:
(01) Earnton Guy Sr. 
(1869-1920)
(02) John Guy  (1872-)
(03) William Alfred Guy  (1875-1953)
(04) Alexander Guy  (1877-)
(05) Ruben Guy  (1879-1946)
(06) Mary Guy-Howard  (1883-1953)
(07) Annette (Nettie) Guy-Matlock  (1886-)
(08) Curtis Guy  (1890-)
(09) Margaret (Maggie) Guy-Saulsberry  (1893-)
(10) Katie Lou Guy-Abram  (1896-)

Only four of their ten children would have children of their own. The four were Earnton, William, Ruben and Mary. (In October of 2008 it was discovered that Baldy's other 3 daughters, Nettie, Maggie and Katie Lou had indeed married and had families of their own). The families of Earnton, William and Ruben have been able to keep in contact with each other over the years. After years of searching we have been blessed to re-establish contact with Mary's family and will never become disconnected again.

Earnton married Ida Phillips and they had (14) fourteen children. William married Agnes Scott and they had (4) four sons. Ruben married Magnolia Thomas and they had (9) nine children. Mary married Albert Howard Sr. and they had (13) thirteen children. Nettie married George Matlock. Maggie married Andrew Saulsberry. Katie Lou married James Abram.

Margaret's mother, Mary Anne Norton, was a slave owned by Patrick Norton in Warren County, Georgia. Margaret's father was a white man named Thomas Baker, a store owner in Georgia. Margaret's racial make-up would be continually confirmed by the United States Federal Census. They listed her race alternately as white and her children as Mulatto all the while listing her husband Baldy as black. This census dates back to 1870, go figure. The first census that included African Americans by name was taken in 1870, before that the government kept track of slaves by who owned them , they sex and their age.

By all accounts, Baldy was a devoted husband and father. He was an active member of his church and enjoyed an honorable reputation among his neighbors, both black and white, and the men he served with in the Civil War. Baldy continued to work on the Rutland Farm until 1909 even though his health was failing. In 1895, thirty years after he was honorably discharged from the military, he filed for his Military Pension due to his ever-declining health. Baldy spent a lot of time petitioning the Department of the Interior for his pension benefits. It is because he was repeatedly rejected that we were able to obtain so much information about him and and the rest of his family. He had to secure character witnesses whom you will meet in the affidavits they gave on behalf of Baldy to attest to his character and his ever failing health. Baldy was subjected to numerous physical examinations to secure his pension, and increases of same for disabilities due to his war injury, malaria and heart disease cause by years of suffering with rheumatism. He was granted his pension and would return to the government on a regular basis to request increases, which were eventually granted.

 
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This is why the affidavits given on his behalf by his friends are dated from 1869 to 1902. The last time he petitioned the government was in 1907. His "X" is shown on page 14-d as he requests that his pension be raised from $6.00 a month to $12.00 a month. The request was approved.

He used an attorney, Henry D. Phillips to help him; Mr. Phillips' fee was $2.00. When you consider the value of a dollar then as to now you can see that these numbers are not as out of line as they seem.

After he died his wife Margaret was able to receive a Widows Pension for herself and their minor child Katie Lue, who was (15) fifteen years old when Baldy died. Baldy and his beloved Maggie (Margaret's nickname) had been married (42) forty-two years when he died.

You will also meet family and friends as they come to Margaret's aid as they had come to Baldy's. You will meet Margaret's mother, her sister and Baldy's brother George in their own words as they are called upon to authenticate Margaret's claim for a Widow's Pension from her husband Baldy. Again, for easy readability these depositions have been typed, but the originals are available for your review if you want to get a feel for the times in which these documents were created. (Contact Willie C. Guy-Hinton or Darin (Pookie) Leake Sr. for copies of the original affidavits and depositions).

Baldy and his brother George remained close and good friends in addition to being brothers. They lived near each other and assisted each other as can be seen in the depositions that they gave for each other as they tried to provide for their families when they were no longer able to work. Baldy died on January 28, 1911. He was (75) seventy-five years old. He had been able to see his own children born free and (25) twenty-five of his (40) forty grandchildren born free as well.

Slavery's human toll can never be calculated but it clearly ranks among the worst crimes against humankind. Our ancestors not only survived this horror, they were able to thrive and have passed on their strengths and good character to their descendants. They seemed to have handled this as a tragic sidestep as they marched their way to greatness determined to show their descendants how to grow and achieve.

After reading the hundreds of pages of the documents Darin (Pookie) Leake Sr. (7th Generation) was able to retrieve from the Department of the Interior, I feel as if I have been personally introduced to my Paternal Great-Grandfather Baldy Guy. I have a new found love and respect for all our ancestors who lived through those challenging times. I want to thank Baldy for persevering and having the courage to lead an exemplary life and for insisting that he get what was rightfully his. His family learned this lesson well and followed his lead when it became their turn to take charge of their lives.

Baldy and all his children and grandchildren have passed on but his great-grandchildren, great-great-grandchildren and other descendants, which now includes (9) nine generations, are still carrying on his name proudly and still embrace the values he lived by.

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The family has continuously tried to strengthen family ties and bring all family members close together by having Family Reunions every year or at least every other year since 1983. This will be the first reunion we have had since 1991 so maybe we can get back on track this year. This has been a successful undertaking and we hope to contact all descendants of Baldy and George Guy  as we go forward into the future.

People I really would like to have known:

There is no one alive today who knew Baldy or Margaret Guy. We have decided to let you meet them by sharing some of the information contained in Affidavits and Depositions given by friends, neighbors and family on behalf of Baldy and Margaret. Please read through the repetitions and find the Family History that is given in each one.

The following are excerpts from affidavits given by friends as they came to support Baldy's application for his Military Pension:
(The claimant is Baldy Guy). The Government required that witnesses be provided to support Baldy's claim of disability. By this time Baldy weighted 130 pounds on his 5 ft. 4 & 1/2 inch frame, so the government felt that they had to rule out vicious habits as the cause of his condition. By all accounts he was slightly built and probably never weighted much more than that.

All Affidavits and Depositions are in the same wording as it appeared on the original documents. No changes were made at all.


Affidate Date:November 11, 1896
*** Given By: Aaron Keys - Neighbor and Friend
The affidavit has known the claimant about 25 years. For 17 years he has lived close to him. Claimant is a farmer. Some five or six years ago he observed that he was giving down. In passing through his farm would sometimes find him lying down over come with heat exertion, find him in bed frequently. Not able apparently to do any labor. Believes that he contracted his diseases where he now lives. He lived on the same farm for nine years. Affidavit knows that claimant did not bring on his disabilities by any vicious habits.

Affidavit Date: April 21, 1899
*** Given By: Aaron Keys
" I have known Baldy Guy since 1867. Have lived near him for that length of time. Have lived on adjoining farms for the last 11 years. I have known him intimately. Applicant's eyes were in bad condition on March 16, 1895 and continue so and are now in bad condition. "

 
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Affidavit Date: February 26, 1902
*** Given By: Aaron Keys
Affidavit say that he has known claimant for 30 years and that he knows from his long and personal acquaintance with claimant that he has suffered with his left shoulder in which claimant advises he received a gunshot wound during the Civil War. Affidavit states that claimant has suffered from disease of heart to his personal knowledge for the past ten years. Affidavit states further regarding matter of the gunshot wound of claimant in left shoulder, that claimant has suffered for more than ten years to his knowledge.

Affidavit Date: November 25, 1896
*** Given By: John Anderson - Long time friend and neighbor
" I have known Baldy Guy for between 30 and 40 years, when he was a slave he was a stout able-bodied man to all appearances. Sometimes during the war he complained of his eyes being effected his looked to be inflamed and is bad yet. He complains of rheumatism a great deal in fact he is not able to work more than half the time. He was shot in the left shoulder at the fight at Guntown , Mississippi. He has very little use of his left arm. He complains very much of shortness of breath when he is trying to work at any hard work or walking fast. Baldy Guy is a sober steady man not addicted to any vicious habits, I live within a half-mile of him and know his habits. "

Affidavit Date: November 11, 1896
*** Given By: E. G. Keaton - Fellow Church Member and Neighbor
Affidavit has known Baldy Guy about twenty-eight years. Have lived within one mile of him for twenty years of that time. Claimant is a farmer. Some eight year ago he was complaining of Rheumatism and his complaint has grown upon him. He became diseased as far as I know where he now resides in Desoto County, Mississippi. Affidavit has known claimant intimately the whole time of his acquaintance and know that he did not contract his disability from any vicious habits whatever, his habits are good.

Affidavit Date: April 21, 1899
*** Given By: E. G. Keaton
" I have known Baldy Guy since 1869. I have lived very near him for 20 or more years. I know him well and intimately for that length of time. We are both members of the same church. I am and have been a Deacon of our church and it is my duty as such officer to look after the brethren and especially them afflicted. I therefore have some personal knowledge of the condition of applicant's eyes. I can say that his eyes were in bad shape on March 16, 1895 and remained so until November 27, 1895. I am fully of the opinion that applicant has not been able to do one-fourth manual labor on account of the condition of his eyes. "
 
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Affidavit Date: November 25, 1896
*** Given By: Edward Young - Fellow Civil War Soldier and Neighbor

" I knew Baldy Guy in the Army, I belonged to Company R Applicant, Baldy Guy belonged to Company B. We both belonged to the same regiment , which was the 55th Colored Infantry. When I first knew Baldy Guy I think it was about 1863 probably 1864. He was a stout able-bodied man to all appearances he was a healthy man as far as can tell up to the time he got wounded in the shoulder at the Guntown fight in Mississippi. Often times he complained a great deal of his eyes failing him and he still complains of his shoulder and hips hurting him very much. He has very little use of his left arm. Baldy Guy is a man of good habits. He did not bring on his disabilities by vicious habits. "

Affidavit Date: February 28, 1902
*** Given By: Albert Matlock Sr. - Neighbor and Friend

Affidavit has known Baldy Guy for 20 years and that he has been attendance when claimant was confined to his bed with smothering spells, the severity of which was such as to cause great apprehension of claimant's recovery. Spells caused by disease of the heart of which claimant is affected and has been for the past seven or eight years. Left shoulder is affected by the gunshot he received during the war between the states and that this injury if of a permanent nature and prevents him from being a sound man. I lived within less than one-fourth of a mile from claimant for past 13 years.

Two years before he died, Baldy and Margaret moved from the Rutland Farm and lived next door to their third born son William, ( Uncle Bill ) as we would refer to him in the future with great affection. Baldy received his pension and the scheduled increases as they were allowed until he died on January 11, 1911. As a matter of fact he had applied for the current increase and it had been approved. His final Pension Voucher arrived a few days after his death and had to be returned.

We continue to look for Baldy Guy's final resting-place and when we find it we will petition the Department of the Interior for an Appropriate Civil War Head Stone. Also we will petition them for the Purple Heart Medal he should have earned for his injury during the Civil War. We think Baldy is buried somewhere in New Hope Baptist Church's Cemetery in Southaven, Mississippi.

 
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Baldy Guy's Enlistment Record in the Civil War May 18, 1863
Baldy Guy's Enlistment Record in the Civil War May 18, 1863
- 14a -
Baldy Guy's Muster Out (discharge) from Civil War December 31, 1865
Baldy Guy's Muster Out (discharge) from Civil War December 31, 1865
- 14b -
Certification of marriage of Baldy Guy and Margaret Baker-Guy January 30, 1869
Certification of marriage of Baldy Guy and Margaret Baker-Guy January 30, 1869
- 14c -
Baldy Guy's final petition for Military Pension increase on December 23, 1907
Baldy Guy's final petition for Military Pension increase on December 23, 1907
- 14d -
Margaret Norton-Guy
(1852-1921)
*************************
Upon her husband's death, it was now Margaret's turn to petition the Department of the Interior for a Widow's Pension for herself and her minor child, Katie Lou Guy. H. Bowe, the Post Master General, initiated the first correspondence in this regard by a letter he wrote to Mississippi Pension Agent, William Rule. The letter is dated January 25, 1911 and reads as follows: " I am returning Pension Certificate and Voucher to you by request of his family, as he is dead. Died 21st January and the widow ask for burial expenses and to be put on the pension list and if so please send application blanks as soon as possible. His wife is a good old lady and I would like to see her get a pension if could be allowed. "

Respect
H.Bowe


Response from the Department of the Interior is shown on pages 24-a and 24-b. These are but a sample of the paperwork that the government required. All of the depositions you will read were made necessary by requests for information and confirmation of that information.

Family, please meet Margaret Norton-Guy our Maternal Great-Grandmother
Deposition Dated: January 10, 1912
*** Given By: Margaret Norton-Guy

" I am the widow of Baldy Guy. He served in Company 55 U S C Infantry during the late Civil War. I don't know the dates of his enlistment and discharge. I never heard him say that he enlisted more than once. He was a pensioner. He died on Saturday about 4 or 5 o'clock in the afternoon, either the third or fourth Saturday in January 1911. I don't know date, I can't remember dates. All I can say is that the very same evening he died I had my daughter-in-law, Agnes Guy, write the date of my husbands death in an old account book, and she will tell you that she wrote it in that book the very day my husband died. " (Claimant exhibits old daybook in which the following entries appear written with a lead pencil.  Katie Lou Guy Born in the year of Lord 1897 March 15, father Baldy Guy died January 21, 1911. I can give no opinion as to weather the record is genuine. H.L.E. Special Examiner). " Baldy and I were never divorced, we lived together continuously from the date of our marriage until he died. I have not remarried or lived as the wife of any man until I married Baldy Guy and he claimed he had never been married before he married me. I was 18 years old when I married him. I was married right in Nesbit, Mississippi this county the first or second year after the surrender. Well now, it was two years or three years after the surrender. After thinking of the matter and counting the years where I lived I think it was during the third year after the surrender that I married Baldy Guy. "

 
- 15 -
 
" We were married in the Halliburton Church, no, you didn't understand me, we were married by the pastor of that church, in Tom Nesbit's house. He is dead, I mean Tom Nesbit. He was a white man. I was working for him and his wife as their house girl. Mrs. Nesbit is dead too. The preacher who married us was Hub Meredith, now dead. We had a license from the Court House in Hernando, Mississippi, this county, but the clerk of the court couldn't find any record of our marriage. Henderson Price and my mother, Mary Norton, are the only persons now living who saw the soldier that I married. My husband was always called Baldy Guy  all the time I knew him. While a slave, I was owned by Mrs. Nora Hines, wife of Tom Hines. I was called Margaret Hines, we lived in Wiltse County, Georgia until I was 8 years old, then during the balance of the time that I was a slave I lived in Milledgeville, Georgia. I had lived there with Hugh Trainor and his wife Josephine; she was a sister of Mrs. Nora Hines. She, my owner Mrs. Hines, hired me out to her sister Mrs, Trainor. I know I was 14 years old the year of the surrender and right away after the surrender my mother and I stayed there 9 months and then we moved to a few miles of here, but nearer to Nesbit, this county, ever since I left Austin, Tunica County, Mississippi. I made a mistake saying I was 18 years old when I was married to Baldy Guy. I was just a little more than 17 years old but I was in my 18th year. I married Baldy Guy January 15th and I was 18 years old during the following July. I have a sister Net Norton-Mosely, living near Lake View, this county. I have a sister Cornelia Norton-Wright, wife of Jeff Wright. I don't know her address - she lives somewhere in Oklahoma. I have no brother. My late husband, Baldy Guy, while a slave lived somewhere in North Alabama. I don't know where in Alabama. He told me his owner was named Albert Guy. My husband has a brother named George Guy, living a few miles from my home. I do not know that my husband had any other brother or any sister now living. I had only one child under the age of 16 years at the time my late husband died. The child is named Kate Lou Guy. She will be 15 years old March 15, 1912. I can't figure, I really don't know what year it was she was born. I have kept track of her age and birthday and I am positive her birthday is March 15th and that she was 14 years old her last birthday. She has been in my care and custody ever since her father died. I have not employed any attorney. Mr. W. S. Lester has attended to all the writing in my claim. I have not paid him anything and have no agreement to pay him any fee. He told me that if I got a pension he would charge me twenty-five cents for each time he swore anybody. I do not desire to be present or to be represented by an attorney during the further examination of my claim. I do not desire notice of further examination , you may see my original witnesses and anyone else you think necessary to see. I have heard this deposition read. I have understood the questions; my answers have been correctly recorded. I will add that Baldy Guy came to near where I lived in this county within a very short time after I located there. He told me that from the time he was mustered out of service until he came to our neighborhood he had lived in Memphis, Tennessee. I don't know who knew him while he lived in Memphis only his brother George. "

- 16 -

Deposition Date: January 30, 1912
*** Given By: Margaret Norton-Guy

" I have heretofore testified before you in my claim for pension: Question - Did you ever marry a man named Baker or live as the wife of a man name Baker? Answer - No Sir! I swear I never married any man and never lived as the wife of any man, only Baldy Guy. When I was a girl I was called Maggie or Margaret Norton and Baker. I will explain that my mother Mary Norton while a slave was owned by a man named Norton, that was before Mrs. Hines owned her but she kept the name Mary Norton after Mrs. Hines owned her and she has been called Mary Norton ever since the war. She always told me that my father was a white man named Thomas Baker. I don't know anything about him, I don't know that I ever saw him, at any rate, as I grew up I was called Maggie Baker. No you got that wrong, I was called Maggie Hines while a slave, but after the war and until I married I was called Maggie Baker and also Maggie Norton. I don't know what surname was given as my surname when the license was obtained for my marriage to Baldy Guy. I know he called me Maggie Baker before he married me. "
" I have heard you read the testimony taken by you during the examination of my claim. There are no other witnesses I care to have seen. I have no complaint to make in regard to your conduct of fairness during the examination of my claim. I have heard this deposition read. I have understood the questions; my answers have been correctly recorded. "


Now Family, meet our Maternal Great-Great-Grandmother
Deposition Date: January 10,1912
*** Given By: Mary Norton - Margaret Guy's Mother - Baldy Guy's Mother-in-Law

" My age is 84 years, address - Plum Point, Desoto County Mississippi. Margaret Guy is my daughter. I swear she was never married and never lived as the wife of any man until she married Baldy Guy. I was present and witnessed the marriage by Rev. Hub Meredith, a colored preacher now dead. They were married on Tom Nesbit's farm right at Nesbit, this county. They were never divorced or separated. They lived together as husband and wife from the day they married until he died. Baldy Guy died January 21, 1911. I have remembered the date. I am sure he died January 21, 1911. I knew Baldy Guy from the time he located near Nesbit, this county. I guess that was a year or two years before he married my daughter Margaret. I am sure he did not marry after I became acquainted with him until he married my daughter Margaret. I have never heard that he had been previously married. I signed a paper for use in my daughter's claim for pension. (B.J.8) I acted as midwife when Kate Lou Guy was born. My daughter Margaret had no doctor attend her when her child Kate Lou was born. I waited on her myself. I recollect the child Kate Lou Guy was born March 15th. I have forgotten what year it was but I am sure she will be 15 years old the 15th of this coming March. I don't know why I have remembered the date she was born. I guess just because I tried to keep track of it. I have forgotten the year it was Margaret married Baldy Guy. I believed they married in January well I don't recollect the day of the Month. "
" I have no interest in this claim for pension. I have heard this deposition read, I have understood the questions, my answers have been correctly recorded. "

 
- 17 -
 
Deposition Dated: January 30, 1912
*** Given By: Mary Norton

" I have heretofore testified before you in the claim of my daughter, Margaret Guy. Question - Who was the father of your daughter Margaret Guy? Answer: A white man named Thomas Baker. He was a storekeeper near where I lived while a slave of Patrick Norton. Then when Margaret was a baby my owner moved from Warren County, Georgia where I lived to Wiltse County, Georgia. So Margaret never knew anything about her father, in fact she was hired out when she was about 8 years old, hired out as a nurse girl to my owner's sister, Mrs. Trainor and I didn't see her again until she was 13 years old and that was just after the peace was declared. Margaret was called Margaret Hines while she was a slave but after she was called Maggie or Margaret Norton after me and also Maggie Baker after her father. I swear she was never married to a man named Baker. She never lived as the wife of a man named Baker. She never married any man and never lived as the wife of any man only Baldy Guy. I have heard this deposition read, I have understood the questions, my answers have been correctly recorded. "

Deposition Date: January 10, 1912
*** Given By: William Alfred Guy - Third born child of Baldy & Margaret Guy

" My age is 37 years. Address - Plum Point, Desoto County, Mississippi. Margaret Guy is my mother, my father Baldy Guy died January 21, 1911. I was present when he died and I attended his funeral. I am positive he died January 21, 1911 and he was buried January 22, 1911. I recollect he died on a Saturday evening. My mother has not remarried or lived as the wife of any man since my father died. I swear that my parents, Baldy and Margaret Guy lived continuously  as husband and wife from my earliest recollection until he, my father died.  I never heard that either he or my mother had been married before they married  each other.  I am sure they were never divorced or separated. My mother had only one child under 16 years of age at the date of my father's death, that child is called Kate Lou Guy. She will be 15 years old March 15, 1911. I am sure that is correct. I have remembered the month and day of her birth and I have kept track of her age. She has lived with our mother ever since our father died. I have no interest in this claim for pension. I have heard this deposition read, I have understood the questions, my answers have been correctly recorded. "

 
-18 -
Deposition Date: January 10, 1912
*** Given By: Agnes Scott-Guy - Wife of William Alfred Guy

" My age is 37 years, address, Plum Point, Desoto County, Mississippi. Margaret Guy is my Mother-in-Law, her son William Guy is my husband. I married him December 7, 1902. I have lived about here about 18 years and have known Margaret Guy 18 years. When I became acquainted with her she was living as the wife of Baldy Guy and she continued to live with him as his wife until he died. I know they were not divorced or separated after I became acquainted with them and she has not remarried since he died. I was present when Baldy Guy died and I attended his burial. He died January 21, 1911. I remember the date. I also remember that during the same evening of his death I wrote the date of his death in an old account book that Margaret Guy gave me. She asked me to write the date of her husband's death in that book. Yes sir, the record you have shown me is my writing. I swear I wrote that date in that book on the same day that Baldy Guy died. I made an error in spelling his given name Baley. I omitted the "d" in his name but it was carelessness on my part. I have heard this deposition read. I have understood the questions; my answers have been correctly recorded. "

Notes of InterestAgnes appears to have been the only member of the family who could read and write. She witnesses most of the paperwork involved in her mother-in-law's pension claim and her signature appears on each document as such.

Deposition Date: January 10, 1912
*** Given By: Kate Lou Guy - Margaret and Baldy's youngest child.

" My age my last birthday was 14 years. My address is Plum Point, Desoto County, Mississippi. I am the youngest child of Baldy and Margaret Guy. I have kept March 15th as my birthday. From what my parents taught me about my age when I was a small child, I think I was 14 years old my last birthday. I have kept track of my age several years. I believe I will be 15 years old March 15, 1912. My father died during January 1911. I have forgotten the day of the month.  My mother has taken care of me since my father died. She has not remarried since he died. I have understood the questions; I have heard this deposition read. My answers have been correctly recorded.

Deposition Date: January 10, 1912
*** Given By: Hector Bowe: Longtime acquaintance
and Post Master

" My age is 47 years. Address - Plum Point, Desoto County, Mississippi; Occupation - Merchant, farmer and Post Master at Plum Point. I have lived here all my life. I have known Margaret Guy 36 years. I knew her late husband from 36 years ago until he died. I know that during all those years they lived together as husband and wife. They were not divorced or separated and she has not remarried since he died. I recollect that 3 or 4 days after he died I wrote to the Pension Office and notified them of his death and requested them to send me blank application for a widow's pension. I think he died during January 1911. I have forgotten the day of the month. I signed the papers you have shown me (B J. 5, 6, 12). I have no interest in this claim for pension. I have heard this deposition read, I have understood the questions, my answers have been correctly recorded. "

 
- 19 -
Family, meet our Maternal Great Aunt
Deposition Date: January 12, 1912
*** Given By: Nettie Norton-Mosely - Margaret Norton-Guy's sister.

" My age is 66 years. Address - Lakeview, Desoto County, Mississippi. Margaret Guy is my sister. She was never been married only one time and that was to Baldy Guy. I was present  when they were married. I cooked the wedding supper. I saw them married by Hub Meredith, a colored preacher. They were married on Tom Nesbit's farm near Nesbit this county. I am positive that Baldy Guy was the only man my sister Margaret ever married, or ever lived with as a wife. She has not remarried since he died. I don't recollect what year it was Margaret and Baldy Guy married. I know it was two or three years after the war. They lived together as husband and wife from the time they married until he died. They were never divorced or separated. Margaret was 16 or 17 years old when she married Baldy Guy. I do not know the age or date of birth of her child Kate Lou Guy. I have no interest in this claim for pension. I knew Baldy Guy two or three years before he married my sister Margaret. He came to our neighborhood near Nesbit, Mississippi with his mother, now dead. I know he did not marry or live as the husband of any woman after I became acquainted with him until he married my sister Margaret. She was going by the name of Margaret Norton after the war and until she married Baldy Guy. Her owner while a slave was named Hines but our mother was called Mary Norton, so after the war we children took the surname Norton. I have heard this deposition read, I have understood the questions, my answers have been correctly recorded. "

Note of Interest: Nettie's son, Sam Mosley, accompanied her to this hearing and acted as a witness.

Deposition Date: January 15, 1912
*** Given By: Mrs. Minnie D. Rutland - Millie and Baldy Guy's Employer.

" My age is 68 years. Address - Horn Lake, Desoto County, Mississippi. I have lived here 36 years. I lived near Nesbit from 1865 until I moved here. I knew Baldy Guy all the time he lived in this county. He came to near Nesbit the year of the surrender or the year after the surrender, Well I think it was early in 1866. I knew him from that time until he died. He lived on my brother-in-law's farm the first year he lived in this county, then he moved to the farm my husband, now dead, owned and he lived on our land until 2 years before he died. He and Margaret came here with us 36 years ago. I am positive Baldy Guy was not married after he moved to near Nesbit, this county, until he married Margaret Norton. He didn't live as the husband of any woman until he married her. They lived together as husband and wife until he died. They were not divorced, they were never separated from the time they married until he died. I knew of their marriage, I saw Margaret's wedding dress before she married Baldy Guy and I knew of their marriage the very day they married. Margaret has not remarried or lived as the wife of any man since Baldy Guy died. I knew Margaret when she and her mother moved to near Nesbit a year, or about a year after the surrender. She was then about 14 or 15 years old. I am sure she did not marry or live as the wife of any man after that time until she married Baldy Guy. "


 
- 20 -
" I knew Baldy Guy while he was a slave. His owner was Mr. Guy and he use to drive Mr. Guy's team from their home in Panola County, Mississippi when they drove to the state line to sell their cotton, and Mr. Guy used to stay over night with my stepfather. That was during the war I think during 1862 and 1863. That was the way I happened to see Baldy Guy while he was a slave, (George Guy and other family members would later dispute this statement) of course I didn't know whether he was then married, but I never heard he had been married until he married Margaret Norton. I want to say that Baldy Guy was an exceptionally conscientious Negro, all the white people here had confidence in him and Margaret, his widow, is one of the best Negro women I ever knew. She has been honest, moral and respectful and truthful all her life since I first knew her. Baldy Guy's mother cooked for me from 1866 to 1876 or 1878, she is now dead. She was a splendid good old Negro. I signed the affidavit you have shown me (BJ 10) I have no interest in this claim for pension. I have heard this deposition read, I have understood the questions, my answers haven been correctly recorded. "

Depostion Date: January 15, 1912
*** Given By: Henderson Price - Long time Friend and Neighbor

" My age is 58 years, address - Plum Point, Desoto County, Mississippi. I have lived in this neighborhood and near Nesbit, this county ever since 1865. I was about 11 or 12 years old when I came here with my parents. We came here the same year of the surrender. Well we first located a few miles west of here, nearer to Nesbit, lived there several years and since then have lived in this neighborhood. I have known Margaret Guy ever since she was about 15 years old. Well ever since she and her mother moved to this county, I know she did not marry or live as the wife of any man after I became acquainted with her until she married Baldy Guy. I can swear to this fact. I was present and saw Baldy Guy and Margaret Norton married. They were married on Tom Nesbit's farm by a colored preacher named Hub Meredith. I am positive that from the time they were married until Baldy Guy died, they lived together as husband and wife and were recognized as husband and wife. They had 10 or 12 children. I am sure they were never divorced or separated. I visited them a good many times each year after they married and have lived within 2 or 3 miles from them ever since they married. Margaret Guy has not married or lived as the wife of any man since Baldy Guy died. I knew Baldy Guy while he was a soldier. I was just a boy then. His regiment was at Corinth, Mississippi and I was there with the colored refugees. I had two brothers in the 55th U.S.C. Volunteer Infantry. Then when Baldy Guy came here right after the war, I remembered him and saw him often from that time until he married Margaret Norton and until he died. He came down here, well between here and Nesbit right away after the close of the war. He was a young man, well in his twenties and he claimed to be a single man. I have never heard that he had been married before he married Margaret Norton. I am sure he did not married or live as the husband of any woman after he came to this county after the surrender until he married Margaret Norton. I am quite certain they had a license to marry. I signed the papers you have shown me (B.J.6.7.10) I have forgotten the exact date of Baldy Guy's death.

 
-21-
" I am certain that Mrs. J. W. Rutland (B.J.10) did not know Baldy Guy until he moved to her neighborhood after the war. I think he lived on a farm owned by her brother-in-law the first year he, Baldy Guy, lived in this county. I am not related to this claimant. I have no interest in her claim for pension. I have heard this deposition read, I have understood the questions, my answers have been correctly recorded. "

Notes of Interest: Henderson Price's nephew Sheridan Price would later marry Baldy Guy's granddaughter Willie Guy-Price.

Now meet our Great Uncle George:
Deposition Date: January 16, 1912
*** Given By: George Guy - Baldy Guy's brother - and Our Great Uncle.

" My age is 65 years, address - Lewisburg, Desoto County, Mississippi. Baldy Guy was my brother. We served in the same Regiment. He was in Company B and I was in Company H, 55th U.S.C. Colored Volunteer Infantry. While slaves we lived near Tuscumbia, Alabama. We lived there until we enlisted and went from Tuscumbia, Alabama to Corinth, Mississippi to enlist. Mrs. Rutland is mistaken if she says my brother used to drive from Panola County, Mississippi past Nesbit with cotton for Mr. Guy, during the war. We were owned by Albert Guy. I don't recollect that Baldy Guy was away from Tuscumbia, Alabama until we enlisted. We ran away together, well the Union Soldiers came to Tuscumbia, Alabama and when they moved to Corinth, Mississippi they took the Negroes about there with them. Baldy and I went with the Union Soldiers and enlisted at the same time and were discharged at the same time. After we were mustered out I stayed in Memphis, Tennessee about one year and then moved down on the Mississippi River Bottom and stayed about one year. Then I moved over to near Nesbit, Desoto County, Mississippi and at the same time my brother Baldy Guy moved down there to near Nesbit. From muster out until he moved to near Nesbit, he lived in Memphis, Tennessee nearly two years. I think he has never married and never lived as the husband of any woman until he married Margaret Norton. They lived together as husband and wife from the time they married until he died. They were never divorced or separated, and she has not remarried since he died. I was not present when they married but I am certain they were lawfully married. I have no other living brother that I know of or any sister living that I know of. I am positive that Margaret Norton was the first and only wife my brother Baldy Guy ever had. She was young when she married him and I am sure she was never married until she married him. I do not know the date of birth of their child, Kate Lou Guy. I have no interest in this claim for pension. I have heard this deposition read, I have understood the questions, my answers have been correctly recorded. "

 
- 22 -
Deposition Date: January 25, 1912
*** Given By: Ja
eremih Tate - Fellow Civil War Soldier and long time Friend.
" My age is about 67 years. Address - Nesbit, Desoto County, Mississippi. During the Civil War, I served under the name of Jeremiah Prophet in Company 55 U.S.C. Colored Infantry from May 25, 1863 to December 31, 1865. My pension certificate is No. 1.085937. I was well acquainted with Baldy Guy while he was a soldier. I did not know him before he was a soldier.
After I was mustered out of the service I came right down here and have lived here ever since. Baldy Guy came here about one year after I did and I knew him intimately all the time he lived here and even after he moved to Plum Point in this county. I am sure he did not marry while he was a soldier or after he came here to live until he married Margaret Norton. I understood that he was a single man while he was a soldier also while he lived here until he married Margaret Norton. They lived together from the time they married until he died. They were not divorced or separated. I never heard that he had been married before he married her. I was well acquainted with her all the time she lived here before she married Baldy Guy. I am sure she did not marry or live as the wife of any man after she and her mother came to this neighborhood to live until she married Baldy Guy. When I became acquainted with her she was called Margaret Norton. I never heard her called Margaret Baker. I never heard that she had lived as the wife of a man named Baker. Why she was quite young when she married Baldy Guy. I think about 17 years of age. I am not related to her. I have no interest in her claim for pension. I have heard this deposition read, I have understood the questions, my answers have been correctly recorded. "

 
*************************************************
 
Margaret finally was granted her pension. The Certificate of Pension is shown on page 24-C. She was able to receive the same rate that Baldy was receiving at the time of his death, $12.00 per month and an additional $2.00 per month for her minor daughter.  It was eventually increased to $30.00 per month for her after Kate Lou became grown.

Margaret was only 60 years old when Baldy died and it appears that she went on with her life. Raising her minor child Kate Lou, remaining active in her Church and continuing to be an outstanding member of her community. About nine years after Baldy died she became ill  and she was cared for by her daughter-in-law Agnes Guy. In early June 1921 Margaret became very ill and on June 7, 1921, her family summoned Dr. J.A. Rhodes. He treated her until June 13, 1921. Dr. F.M. Malone was called in and treated her from June 17 to July 19, 1921.  Dr. Malone was the doctor who had also treated Baldy when he became ill in the past.

 
- 23 -
Margaret died on July 29, 1921 from asthma, followed by Cardiac Dilatation. She was 70 years old, her death records shows that she was buried in Jago, Mississippi and we believe that she is buried in New Hope Church's Cemetery. By the time Margaret dies her oldest son Earnton, my grandfather, has died. He died on May 12, 1920 and in September of the same year his third oldest daughter, Elizabeth Guy, married Rev. Lester Dandridge. Earnton was only 50 years old when he died and his wife, Ida, was left to care for seven underage children still living at home. Ruben Guy who was about 42 years old at the time had moved with his wife, Magnolia Thomas-Guy and his children to Illinois. Mary Guy-Howard was 37 years old and is now living with her husband Albert Howard Sr. in Arkansas and they have at least 7 children. Margaret's youngest child, Kate Lou, is 25 and William (Uncle Bill) is 47 years old. He and his wife, Agnes Scott-Guy have 3 children still living at home but it was left to them to settle Margaret's affairs. William, having learned a few things from his father wrote a letter to the Bureau of Pension on October 21, 1921 to ask reimbursement for the final expenses for his mother. The letter read: " Enclosed find doctor bills and Coffin bill for Margaret Guy who died about two or three days before her Pension Check came. Her check was returned to the department. We her children think you should pay this debt if you can see your way clear to do so as we are not financially able to pay it. Please let me hear from you soon in regard to this matter." Will Guy (her son)

Doctors treated Margaret while she was sick. She was buried on the good reputation of herself and her family. Her creditors knew that they would be paid, but in June of 1922 William is still trying to get the bills paid. The government's final letter and his reply are shown on page 24-d and page 24-e which confirms that he was reimbursed on October 23, 1922. This ends an important milestone in OUR STORY, but there is much more to be told.

- 24 -
Margaret Norton-Guy applies for Military Widow's Pension
Margaret Norton-Guy applies for Military Widow's Pension
- 24a -
Margaret Norton-Guy applies for Military Widow's Pension
Margaret Norton-Guy applies for Military Widow's Pension
- 24b -
Margaret Norton-Guy's Pension Certificate for herself and her minor child Kate Lou Guy
Margaret Norton-Guy's Pension Certificate for herself and her minor child Kate Lou Guy
- 24c -
Margaret Norton-Guy has died and her son William (Uncle Bill) successfully petitions the United States Government for reimbursement of Margaret's final expenses
Margaret Norton-Guy has died and her son William (Uncle Bill) successfully petitions the United States Government for reimbursement of Margaret's final expenses
- 24d -
Margaret Norton-Guy has died and her son William (Uncle Bill) successfully petitions the United States Government for reimbursement of Margaret's final expenses
Margaret Norton-Guy has died and her son William (Uncle Bill) successfully petitions the United States Government for reimbursement of Margaret's final expenses
- 24e -
George Guy
(1845-1928)

****************
George Guy was born in 1845 in Tuscumbia, Alabama to a slave lady named Millie Guy. Millie already had an older son named Baldy Guy. George is Baldy's younger brother. Millie was about thirty-two years old when Baldy was born so we think she might have had other children that were born and probably sold into slavery by the time she was relocated from South Carolina to Tuscumbia, Alabama. Baldy nor George ever said that they had no other brothers or sisters but on more than one occasion they stated that they did not know if they had any brothers or sisters still living.

George ran off with his brother Baldy and joined the Civil War in 1863 and remained there until December 31, 1865 when the war ended. The south had surrendered and slavery in America had come to an end. George's enlistment record and his Muster Out Record are shown on pages 28-a and 28-b.

After being Honorably Discharged from the Union Army of the Civil War, George relocated to near Nesbit, Mississippi in 1866 along with his mother Millie and his brother Baldy. He and Baldy had lived in and around Memphis, Tennessee for almost two years after leaving the service to enjoy their new freedom. On January 15, 1870 George married Alice Grant Winters-Guy, who was born in 1854. The 1870 Census show them living with George's mother Millie Guy. Alice had two children by George but only one lived. The baby that lived was name Annie Belle Guy-Williams, born in 1869 in Lewisburg, Mississippi. Belle did not live with George so we assume that she lived with her mother and other relatives, because the next time we hear from her is after George dies and she has agreed to help Katie get her pension started. In the intervening years Alice and George lived apart and she moved to Memphis, Tennessee. Alice becomes ill of unknown causes and dies on August 2, 1884 in a hospital at 1845 Orleans Street - Ward 7 in Memphis, Tennessee. Her body was brought back to Mississippi and buried on the Rutland Farm where her brother-in-law, Baldy Guy, worked.

George's mother Millie Guy died during this time as well. George later married Katie Washington-Guy, who was born in May 1858. They would marry on April 9, 1886 and have seven children together. Their names were:


(1) Jimmie Guy  (1871-)
(2) Alice Guy-Miles  (1877-)
(3) Pauline Guy  (1880-)
(4) Walter Guy  (1882-)
(5) Rosie Guy  (1889-)
(6) Estella Guy-Lawery  (1895-)
(7) Frazier Guy  (1898-1981)

In 1880 we find George living with his wife Katie and their three children. Jimmie age 9, Alice age 3 and Pauline age 3 months. His mother-in-law Rachel Burford lives with them, as does a niece named Caroline Scott. Every census reviewed after this date shows George living with his wife Katie and their children who still lived at home.

 
- 25 -
 
George continued to live near his brother Baldy. By 1909 he has applied for his Military Pension and Baldy comes to his aid. He gave a deposition on January 22, 1909 to verify the information that George had gave on his application and the deposition reads as follows:

" I Baldy Guy (brother of claimant) was a member of CO B 55th U.S. Colored Infantry, know of my personal knowledge that George Guy the applicant for pension was a member of CO H 55th U.S. Colored Infantry and that George Guy is the identical person who served in CO H 55th U.S. Colored Infantry. These facts I know of my personal knowledge. "
He signs this document as he had all the others with his "X".

George got his pension and the scheduled increases. The next time we hear from George is in 1911 when he comes to help his widowed sister-in-law Margaret as she tries to get her Widow's Pension after Baldy died. The 1920 Census shows George and Katie sharing their home with their youngest son Frazier and his wife Ella Guy. Frazier's stepson Moses McGowan also lives with them, as does a niece named Georgia Williams. Everybody in the household's race is shown as Mulatto except George and his is listed as black. George died on October 30, 1928 and was buried at Wiggins Chapel AME Church in Olive Branch, Mississippi on October 31, 1928.

 
****************
 
After George died it was now Katie Guy's turn to petition the government for her Widow's Pension just as Margaret had to do after Baldy died. Three years after George died Katie is still trying to get her pension. Pages 28-c and 28-d shows some of the first documents presented and are dated November 6, 1928 and May 18, 1931. We will present several of the documents and depositions for your information and historical purposes because we have not been able to establish contact with George's descendants to date. We will continue to try and are asking for help from everyone. Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated. Depositions are shown below:

Deposition Date: May 15, 1931
Given By:
Katie Washington-Guy

" I was told by my mother, that I was 4 years old when the "war ceased". My post office address is Olive Branch, Mississippi. The Lewisburg post office was lately discontinued. I have been sworn by you. I am the Katie Guy who is claiming pension as the widow of George Guy, who was a soldier in the Civil War, he was a pensioner, and died October 30, 1928, in the house in which we now sit. I have lived in this house with my son Frazier Guy ever since the soldier, George Guy, died. "

" My mother was Rachel and my father was George Washington. I was born in Byhalia, Mississippi. Both my parents are dead. I was raised at Horn Lake, Mississippi. I have been married only once, and that was to George Guy. I was a grown woman when I married to him. I was living in Olive Branch when I married, living with my mother; father died when I was a baby. I went by the name Katie or Catherine Washington until I married to George Guy. "

 
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" We married in Memphis, Tennessee in the house of my niece, Cornelia Walker, now dead. Rev. John or Jack Parker said the marriage ceremony. I was a stranger in the place where we married, and do not know the names of the persons who were present  at the wedding. I do not know the date of our marriage. I do not know the day of the week we married. "

" George Guy had been married only once prior to his marriage to me. His first wife was Alice. I never met Alice. She died before I married to George Guy. I heard that Alice died in Memphis, Tennessee and was buried in Mississippi. Millie Blackburn is a cousin of Alice. I do not know of any other person who knows of the death of Alice. I do not know of any person who knew George Guy before he married to Alice. I do not know when nor where he married to Alice. I made his acquaintance after Alice died. I lived with George Guy from the time I married to him until his death; we were never divorced nor separated. I have not remarried since the death of my husband, George Guy. I do not know of any person now living who knew me before I married to George Guy except Millie Blackburn. "

" I have five (5) living children; the youngest is Frazier Guy with whom I now live. He is 32 years old. He is the only one of my children who helps me any. I have not paid nor agreed to pay any money to any person as a fee in my pension claim. I have paid for "putting the seals on all the papers in my claim". I do not owe anyone anything on my pension claim. Millie Blackburn is the only person now living who knew George Guy before he married to me, so far as I know. I do not desire to be present in person or by attorney, in the examination of my pension claim either here or elsewhere, and I waive notice of further examination. I have heard the forgoing deposition read and it is correct. George Guy is the only name the soldier had that I have heard of. He belonged to the Petty Family somewhere in Alabama. He went into the army as George Guy, and always kept that name. "


Deposition Date: May 15, 1931
Given By:
Millie Blackburn

" I am over 70 years old; I do not know my exact age. I was born a slave. My post office address is Nesbit, RR1, Mississippi. I am the widow of Jack Blackburn. I know Katie Guy, widow of George Guy. I knew her before she married to George Guy, but I do not know what her name was then more than it was "Katie". I did not know any of her folks. If she had any brother or sister I do not know it. I understood that Katie married to George Guy, but I was not at the wedding. I do not know where the marriage ceremony was said. They lived together as husband and wife for a long time. She was living with George Guy when he died.  I have seen Katie only once since the death of George Guy, and that was when I went with her to Hernando, Mississippi to sign a paper in her pension claim. "

" The first wife George Guy has was my cousin Alice Winters. I was staying with Alice's mother; Nancy Winters, when George Guy married to Alice. They married in this county soon after the colored folks were freed. He had not been married prior to his marriage to my cousin Alice. "

 
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" Alice had two children by him. One is know living, Belle, surnames not known. She stays about Lewisburg. I do not know whether or not Belle has a husband. My cousin, Alice, wife of George Guy, died in Memphis, Tennessee and her body was brought home for burial. I saw her dead body buried on the Rutland place. George was staying on the Maple place at the time Alice died, but they were not separated.  Now it seems to me that Alice left George before she went to Memphis, Tennessee. I do not know where she was staying nor what she was doing at the time she died. I do not know what ailment she died of, nor what doctor waited on her. I reckon it was about a year after Alice died when George Guy married to Katie. Yes, I am sure that Alice died before George Guy married to Katie. I understood that Katie had not be married prior to her marriage to George Guy. I have heard you read my former statement in this case and it is correct. I am not kin to Katie. I have no interest in her pension claim. I have heard the foregoing affidavit read and it is correct. "

Deposition Dated: March 16, 1929
Given By: Peter Miller and Louis Miller

" We have been personally acquainted with and living in the same community with George Guy and his wife, Katie Guy, for more than 35 years, and we know of our personal knowledge the said George Guy and Katie Guy lived together as husband and wife in said community, viz: Lewisburg, Desoto County, Mississippi and were recognized as husband and wife for and during said period time and to the date of his death. "

Peter Miller further states under oath that he is 60 years of age and his post office address is Olive Branch, Mississippi R-1. Louis Miller further states under oath that he is 50 years of age and that his post office address is Olive Branch, Mississippi R-1.

 
*****************************
 
Katie finally got her pension. the notification letter is shown on page 28-e. She got her scheduled increases and was entitled to them until she died. We do not know when that was but we continue to search.


Notes of Interest: We have not been able to contact George Guy's descendants, but a man introduced himself to a family member as a member of George's family and his last name was "Miller". We are waiting to hear further from him but in the meantime we continue our search and welcome help from anyone who can help.


 
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George Guy's Enlistment Record in the Civil War June 4, 1863
George Guy's Enlistment Record in the Civil War June 4, 1863
- 28a -
George Guy's Muster Out (discharge) from the Civil War December 31, 1865
George Guy's Muster Out (discharge) from the Civil War December 31, 1865
- 28b -
George Guy has died and his final Pension check is returned.
George Guy has died and his final Pension check is returned.
- 28c -
Katie Washington-Guy applies for Military Widow's Pension May 18, 1931
Katie Washington-Guy applies for Military Widow's Pension May 18, 1931
- 28d -
Katie Washington-Guy received her Military Widow's Pension June 30, 1931
Katie Washington-Guy received her Military Widow's Pension June 30, 1931
- 28e -
George Guy's Death Certificate
George Guy's Death Certificate
- 28f -
Original Earnton Guy Sr. Family Home
Original Earnton Guy Sr. Family Home
Generation Three
********************

 
We are including here only Baldy and Margaret Guy's Children who had children of their own. We have no information on the remainder of their children. We also do not have any information on the children of George Guy. We will give only a brief story here of the lives of these great people. They have hundreds of living descendants who can write a better more complete story than we ever could. We will be asking them to do just that by the time we have another reunion. All of us are members of one of the four Family Trees shown below and this is what we will concentrate on at this time.
 
EARNTON GUY SR.

WILLIAM ALFRED GUY

RUBEN GUY

MARY GUY-HOWARD


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Earnton Guy Sr.
Earnton Guy Sr.
Earnton Guy Sr.
The Oldest Child of
Baldy and Margaret Guy

******************************
Earnton Guy Sr. was born on November 14, 1869 in Desoto County, Mississippi. He accepted Christ at an early age and served as a Steward and Trustee of Phoenix Chapel AME Church for many years. In 1891 he married Idella (Ida) Phillips who was born on December 15, 1870. This union produced fourteen (14) children, four (4) girls and ten (10) boys. He was a carpenter and a farmer. He became one of the first people in the family to own land when he purchased forty (40) Acres of land and built his first home on it. His home was a log cabin. He and his family lived and farmed there until his death on May 12, 1920. He was only fifty (50) years old when he died. His wife, Ida, was left to care for seven underage children who still lived at home. Ida died on December 5, 1928. They are both buried in Phoenix Chapel AME Church's Cemetery in Southaven, Mississippi.

When Earnton and Ida died their farm was left to their twelve living children. All received 1/12th of the farm. Eventually Earnton's second oldest son Frank Guy Sr. bought all the interest of the others, which now included a new house. He and his wife, Lula Scallion-Guy, also raised their family there. A side view of the picture of the new house is on page 29. The house and land was sold after the deaths of Frank and Lula Guy.


Children of Earnton Guy Sr. & Ida Phillips-Guy
01. Frazier Guy Sr.  (1893-1984)
02. Bertha Guy  (1895-)
03. Frank Guy Sr.  (1896-1993)
04. Earnton (Papa Coon) Guy Jr.  (1897-1993)
05. Willie Guy-Price  (1899-1993)
06. Walter Guy Sr.  (1901-1983)
07. Elizabeth Guy-Dandridge  (1902-)
08. John Henry Guy  (1904-1960)
09. Robert Guy  (1905-1975)
10. Alonzo Guy  (1906-1957)
11. Emma Guy-Thornton  (1908-1993)
12. Anderson Guy Sr.  (1909-1997)
13. Rufus Guy  (1911-)
14. Nat Guy  (1912-)
 
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William Alfred Guy
William Alfred Guy
William Alfred Guy
 Third Born Child of
Baldy and Margaret Guy

*****************************
William Alfred Guy was born on November 11, 1875 and raised in Desoto County, Mississippi. He confessed hope in Christ at an early age and united with the New Hope Baptist Church. On December 7, 1902 William married Agnes Scott-Guy, who was born in June 1876. To this union four (4) sons were born. William lived and worked as a farmer all of his life in Plum Point and Horn Lake Mississippi. William and Agnes became the caregivers for William's mother Margaret when she became ill and took care of her until she died in 1921.

We called him "Uncle Bill" and when I think of him I get images of what was to me, the tallest man I had ever seen and I can still remember his laughter and his gentleness. The first picture ever taken of me was when I was six months old and I am sitting on his lap. My grandfather, his brother Earnton had been dead a very long time but he still came to visit us regularly.


Children of William Alfred Guy & Agnes Scott-Guy
01. Tommy Guy Sr.  (1903-1959)
02. Willie Ed Guy  (1904-1985)
03. Fred Lewis Guy Sr.  (1907-1972)
04. Theodore Guy  (1912-1962)
 
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Ruben Guy
Ruben Guy
Ruben Guy
Fifth Born Child of
Baldy and Margaret Guy

*****************************
Ruben Guy was born on May 29, 1879 in Desoto County, Mississippi. In 1904 he married Magnolia Thomas-Guy, who was born in August 1885. To this union nine (9) children were born. Ruben was a farmer all of his life. He was a hard worker always striving for better living conditions for his family. He lived and farmed in Mississippi and Germantown, Tennessee where his youngest son Leroy was born. After leaving Tennessee he moved to Missouri and finally settled in Southern Illinois where he bought a farm and lived there until his death on December 7, 1946.

Ruben's youngest son Leroy passed on June 30, 2001. He was the last living child of Ruben and Magnolia. Leroy's wife Rosalie still lives in Peoria, Illinois. She is a retired schoolteacher. For many years Leroy and Rosalie were the only members of Ruben's family that we knew, but I am happy to announce that we have located his grandchildren and great-grandchildren and we will always keep in touch. His descendants will write his story as we are continuing to locate them and make contact with them.


Children of Ruben Guy & Magnolia (Maggie) Thomas-Guy
01. Eddie Guy Sr.  (1903-1973)
02. Louella Guy  (1905-)
03. Priscilla Guy  (1906-)
04. Lorenzo (Sam) Guy  (1907-1969)
05. Lindsay Guy  (1909-)
06. Katie Mae Guy-Reed  (1910-1993)
07. Idella Guy-Kirk  (1914-1982)
08. Sally Guy-Bolden  (1919-2004)
09. Leroy Guy Sr.  (1922-2001)
 
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Mary Guy-Howard
Mary Guy-Howard
Mary Guy-Howard
Sixth Born Child and
Oldest Daughter of
Baldy and Margaret Guy

*******************************
Mary Guy-Howard was born in 1884 as the sixth child and oldest daughter. She was born and reared in Horn Lake, Mississippi where she spent her early years. In 1904 she married Albert Howard Sr., who was born on  March 9, 1883 in Senatobia, Mississippi. To this union eleven (11) children were born. They moved to Edmondson, Arkansas where  she reared her family. Until very recently we had not been able to locate Mary's family but I am happy to announce that we have found them and we will never become disconnected again.

They will write Mary's story but until then I would like to share a note I got from her granddaughter, Donna Howard-Evans.


Hi Willie and Darin

" I am the granddaughter of Mary Guy-Howard. It warmed my heart to see the pictures of my grandmother that I haven't seen since I was a child. I am now 56 years old.  "

" My grandmother Mary, died in 1953, her son Alexander in 1993. The last of Mary's living children. The oldest Anniebell died at the age of eighteen (18) my father use to say. So, if she was born in1905 she died around 1923. Mary Guy-Howard known to us as "Mama Howard" and Albert was "Papa Howard" to their grandkids. Mary Howard had about that number of children, but her baby was A.D. Howard according to my dad. Five babies, before A.D. only lived to get about 2 years old before they would die. (All in a row). When my Dad found out that his mother was pregnant he asked her to burn the baby bed and they did just that, and Uncle A.D. lived to get into his 60's. "

We will send you more info about Mary Guy-Howard family.
Thanks so much
Love Donna"

Thank you Donna, your precious love note convinced me that each family tree should write their own stories.
Thanks again
Willie C. Guy-Hinton


Children of Mary Guy-Howard & Albert Howard Sr.
01. Annabelle Howard  (1905-1923)
02. Alexander Howard Sr.  (1907-1993)
03. Rosie Lee Howard-Green  (1909-1990)
04. Percy Howard  (1911-)
05. Albert (Buck) Howard Jr.  (1912-1993)
06. Ethel Howard  (1912-)
06. Susie Howard-Cross  (1913-1982)
07. Nettie Howard  (1918-) 
08. Tommy Howard
09. Mami Howard
10. Mary Howard
11. Mary M. Howard
12. A. D. Howard 
(1926-1990)
 
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Generations:

Four

Five

Six

Seven

Eight

&

Nine

*********************************************

 
Please go to the Generation Summary for the above Generations. This part of the story is still being developed and I cannot risk leaving off names or not telling the complete story.

Each Family Tree will be asked to write their families story for posterity and for inclusion in our next Family Reunion Book.

In the meantime please review the Generation Summary and report additions and changes to Darin (Pookie) Leake Sr. as he is constantly updating this web-site as new information becomes available.


 
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