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Mark Wahlberg tops highest paid actor list
Mark Wahlberg tops the list of Forbes' highest paid actors, making over twice the amount of Emma Stone, who was announced as the highest paid actress. Rollo Ross reports.

The Clooneys give $1m to combat hate groups
George and Amal Clooney have announced that they will be donating $1 million to a U.S. non-proft that monitors extremists and hate groups. Rollo Ross reports.

Morgan Freeman to get Screen Actors lifetime award
Morgan Freeman, who has made more than 100 movies over the past 50 years, is announced as the recipient of the lifetime achivement gong at the upcoming SAG awards. Rollo Ross reports.

Cosby changes legal team ahead of retrial
Comedian Bill Cosby's retrial on charges of sexually assaulting a former administrator at his alma mater in 2004 at his Philadelphia-area home will be postponed from November to March of next year, a judge said on Tuesday.

Cosby returns to court with new legal team
Bill Cosby was back in court on Tuesday to seek a judge's approval to have the lawyer who successfully defended the late singer Michael Jackson against child molestation charges, represent him at his sex assault retrial. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Tatum, Driver bring "Logan Lucky" to London
Channing Tatum and Adam Driver walk the red carpet for the premiere of their new film 'Lucky Logan.' Rough cut (no reporter narration).

Comedy legend Jerry Lewis dies at 91
Jerry Lewis, the high priest of low-brow comedy on stage and in movies as well as a fund-raising powerhouse with his annual Labor Day telethon, died on Sunday at the age of 91, his family said.

Comedian, civil rights activist Dick Gregory dies at 84
Dick Gregory, a comedian who lambasted racism and played a prominent role in the 1960s civil rights movement died on Saturday at age 84. Linda So reports.

LA judge rejects bid by Polanski's rape victim to have case dismissed
Los Angeles judge rejects bid by Polanski's rape victim to have case dismissed. Ben Gruber reports.

Taylor Swift creates "Blank Space" on social media
Pop star Taylor Swift creates fan frenzy and speculation by wiping all her social media accounts. Rollo Ross reports.

Former ABBA member Benny Andersson to launch a new album
Singer and songwriter Benny Andersson is thanking you for the music with a new album. Rough Cut - no reporter narration.

Filmmakers prep for quick eclipse scenes, no second takes
Producers of independent films and TV ads are fanning across U.S. states to capture what they hope will be unique scenes using the natural spectacle of Monday's total solar eclipse.

Salma Hayek says she'd like to rescue a man
Salma Hayek and Samuel L. Jackson discuss their roles in upcoming action-comedy film 'The Hitman's Bodyguard'. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

Trump themed pop-up bar to raise money for charities
'Twumps' pop-up bar in London, which is based on U.S President Donald Trump's residence Trump Towers, is hoping to raise funds for charities affected by White House policy. Rough cut (no reporter narration).

O.J. Simpson LA exhibit shows memorabilia as art
More than 20 years after the so-called Trial of the Century, an art exhibit examines the public's enduring fascination with O.J. Simpson during his sensational arrest and murder trial. Ben Gruber reports.

O.J. Simpson LA exhibit shows memorabilia as art
More than 20 years after the so-called Trial of the Century, an art exhibit examines the public's enduring fascination with O.J. Simpson during his sensational arrest and murder trial. Ben Gruber reports.

Obi Wan Kenobi to get own film - reports
Film publication The Hollywood Reporter say that British director Stephen Daldry is in talks to direct a Star Wars movie surrounding Obi Wan Kenobi. Rollo Ross reports.

Michael Moore says Trump is 'going to get us all killed'
The filmmaker makes his Broadway debut in his one-man show "The Terms of My Surrender." Rough Cut (no reporter narration)

"Stage" division tango dancers shine at annual festival
Dancers battle for the "stage" category finals at the World Tango Festival and Championship in Buenos Aires. Roselle Chen reports.

John Cleese honored at Sarajevo Film Festival
British actor John Cleese receives honorary career award at Sarajevo Film Festival. Rough Cut - no reporter narration

Director urges Trump to see 'Detroit' post-Charlottesville
Oscar-winning director Kathryn Bigelow encourages US President Donald Trump to see her new racially charged film "Detroit" after his comments on Charlottesville. Rollo Ross reports.

Filming of next 'Mission: Impossible' on hiatus after Cruise breaks ankle
Tom Cruise breaks his ankle on the set of "Mission: Impossible 6," causing production to go on hiatus. Bob Mezan reports.

Emma Stone tops Forbes' highest-paid actress list
Best Actress Oscar winner Emma Stone takes the top place of Forbes' highest paid actress list ahead of Jennifer Aniston and Jennifer Lawrence. Rollo Ross reports.

Chimpanzees can understand rock paper scissors
Chimpanzees can understand rock paper scissors, Japanese primatologists show. Rough Cut - no reporter narration

A documentary shows a different side of Ferguson riots
Ferguson riots seen through a different lens in new documentary. Rough Cut - no reporter narration

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They traveled to see the eclipse

Sensational saunas with red-hot views

Inside the infamous Versace Mansion
The world-famous Ocean Drive is one of the most photographed stretches of Miami Beach.

20 stunning cliffside beaches

Could new China railway put Laos on the tourist map?
Golden temples, Mekong River cruises, mighty waterfalls, and nearly two dozen national parks.

20 top Middle Eastern foods -- which is the best?
Fresh, wholesome, healthy, rich, aromatic -- it's no wonder that the past decade has seen Middle Eastern cuisine's global profile skyrocketing.

Dubai stopover guide: Make the most of your layover
Dubai International Airport is among the world's busiest.

Classic racing returns to most cycle-loving state in America
When is a race more than a race? When it's an event.

The Four Seasons Surf Club Heralds the Return of Miami Glamor
Miami's Four Seasons Surf Club is a return to classic Miami glamor.

The world's latest goldrush an Italian affair
An 4,000 year old area that was once part of a vast Roman gold mining operation is now seeing a goldrush renaissance.

Sarajevo: The Balkans' new capital of cool
Uniform rows of identical white headstones fill the green space in the small yards of mosques and churches throughout Sarajevo, each one bearing a date that seems too recent for a European war.

Meet the traveler photographing the world -- via Google Street View
In a single day Londoner Jacqui Kenny continent-hops from Sun City, Arizona to Naryn, Kyrgyzstan -- and back again.

For National Tequila Day, the world's best tequila
We hail Casa Gragones, which may be the world's best tequila. It's made San Miguel del Allende, Mexico, recently hailed as best city in the world.

A Chicago club crawl with a bus-driving bluesman
Toronzo Cannon has more energy before 5 a.m. than some people can muster all day.

Woman retakes same Europe vacation photos 30 years later
You can't revisit the past, but thanks to modern photography, you can try to recreate it. Just ask Lisa Werner.

#TeamFiona: How a baby hippo won over the world
The Empire State Building. The Grand Canyon. A baby hippo?

Why this is the airport of the future
With air traffic increasing worldwide each year, finding ways to make aviation more environmentally friendly has become crucial.

UNESCO 2017: Which sites have been added to the World Heritage List?
Made it your mission to visit every single UNESCO World Heritage Site on the planet?

Dronestagram reveals best drone photos for 2017
The best creative, nature, urban and people photos taken from the air are revealed in the 2017 Drontestagram awards.

9 modern architectural wonders of the Middle East
In the first decade of the 21st century, the Gulf region, particularly Dubai, became an architectural playground, with project approvals for insanely expensive and fanciful projects seeming to come almost weekly.

World's 18 most beautiful golf holes
While daunting greens and tempting fairways around the globe conspire to dash the dreams of many a player, there are others that, no matter how frustrating, you have to marvel at.

Spain attacks: Is Europe still a safe travel destination?
The threat of terrorism has become a grim fact of life for parts of Europe.

Nudity in Germany: Here's the naked truth
When I was a kid, my father always used to sunbathe nude in our garden at weekends. In public pools, children of all ages were allowed to run around naked all the time.

Touring the UK? It may be cheaper via Berlin
Planning a trip to England to see Stonehenge and Buckingham Palace? It may be cheaper to add Berlin's Brandenburg Gate to the itinerary.

Which passports offer the most freedom to roam?
When it comes to crossing international frontiers, there's one travel document that opens more doors than any other. And it isn't a U.S. passport.

Dubai Miracle Garden: world's largest natural flower garden
The Dubai Miracle Garden is certainly aptly named considering that -- like pretty much everything in the Middle Eastern city -- it was built on desert land.

20 idyllic beach getaways around Asia
Life's a beach, and in Asia there's a whole lot of good living to be had. We've researched and uncovered the top beach destinations to be found along the shores of this vast continent.

Chinese tourist mistaken as an asylum seeker, spends 2 weeks in shelter
A Chinese tourist spent almost two weeks at a refugee shelter in Germany after authorities mistakenly assumed he was applying for asylum, an official with the German Red Cross told CNN.

10 best cities for a winter holiday
Cold rains and gray skies make winter a trial. But hot drinks, snowy slopes, frozen lakes and a bright yellow sun? That's the kind of winter we can all wrap our mittens around.

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Researchers try to understand naked mole rats' resistance to cancer
With their pinkish, translucent and wrinkly skin, double-saber buck teeth and black-bead eyes, naked mole rats look like characters in a nightmare from hell. In fact, they do live underground in pitch-dark burrows where their air, from a human point of view, can contain chokingly little oxygen, t...

Doctors try new models to push health insurers aside
Just about everyone agrees that the way we pay for primary care needs fixing. Under the current insurance model, doctors get paid for procedures and tests rather than for time spent with patients, which displeases doctors and patients alike and increases costs. Now some medical practices are side...

Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare beneficiaries
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...

Breathless, but not from asthma

Fish and seafood recipe recommendations
Jennifer LaRue Huget offers some suggestions

Fish and seafood recipes
How much fish and seafood should you eat each week? What are some good recipes?

Inside the new Dietary Guidelines: Fish and other seafood
Jennifer LaRue Huget explains how best to incorporate the new dietary guidelines on seafood into your diet.

Parenting an overweight child can be difficult
Should they intervene early and practice a form of benign neglect, hoping that the baby fat will melt away as a child grows?

Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.

Surgeon general says obesity crisis should be addressed together
Surgeon general says obesity crisis should be addressed together.

Wisconsin's health-care fight illustrates challenges as states change leadership
After President Obama signed the nation's health-care overhaul into law, Wisconsin made more headway than virtually anywhere else in the country at preparing to carry the statute out. Then a Republican governor came to power and changed all that.

Drums Alive: Feel the beat, feel the burn
Could Drums Alive be the next Zumba? Vicky Hallett explores Baltimore's latest exercise craze.

Top green vegetables for your health -- and St. Patrick's Day
Get in the spirit with these top five green vegetables.

Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant

An incomplete story was published to this webpage. We apologize for the confusion and inconvenience. Please find our latest coverage at washingtonpost.com

Radiation exposure poses range of potential health problems for Japanese
Among other things, radiation from nuclear power plants could increase cancer rates for decades.

Nurses' strike cost Washington Hospital Center $6 million
Washington Hospital Center spent about $6 million to hire 600 temporary nurses, beef up security and cover other costs during last week's nurses' strike and subsequent lockout at the region's largest hospital, hospital officials said.

Report reveals steep increase in war amputations last fall
The majority of American soldiers undergoing amputation for war wounds last fall lost more than one limb, according to data presented Tuesday to the Defense Health Board, a committee of experts that advises the Defense Department on medical matters.

More information about ranch dressing
The original, handmade batches of buttermilk dressing were made in the mid-1950s by Steve Henson at his Hidden Valley Ranch near Santa Barbara, Calif. Buttermilk is now the sixth ingredient in the Hidden Valley full-fat dressing, after soybean oil, water, egg yolk, sugar and salt; it's third on t...

March madness? A basketball league that doesn't keep score
I recently spent a couple of hours at the Jewish Community Center in Fairfax watching women in their 40s, 50s and 60s play two games of full-court basketball. These were rec-league ballplayers, but there was nothing casual about the games. They played organized zone defense. A ref in black and wh...

Ranch dressing: How good is it for you?
Is ranch dressing the best way to get kids to eat their vegetables?

Milestones in the eradication of smallpox
With officials debating whether to destroy the remaining specimens of the pathogen, here is a look at notable dates in smallpox history:

Should last remaining known smallpox virus die?
Intense debate rages over whether to destroy the remaining laboratory specimens of the smallpox virus.

Smart food choices can cut excess sugar and empty calories from your diet
The average U.S. adult consumes about a half-cup of added sugar a day, which amounts to roughly 355 nutritionally empty calories.

Paperbacks discuss antidepressants and technology's role in marriage
Irving Kirsch's describes "The Emperor's New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth." Spouses Edward M. Hallowell and Sue George Hallowell explain how technology leaves people "Married to Distraction."

Children seem to gain extra weight after having their tonsils removed
A study analyzes data from nine studies, involving 795 children who had a tonsillectomy, with or without adenoid removal, before they turned 18.

Vitamin D deficiency may be a factor in development of allergies
Young people low in Vitamin D may be more prone to allergies, according to a new study.

Doctor-owned centers spark criticism, scrutiny
When Kenneth Baker found out he had prostate cancer, his urologist detailed his options: The 84-year-old was too old for surgery, but he could pick from two forms of radiation or simply wait to see if he really needed treatment.

Health insurers offer patients the option of paying extra for higher-priced care
When consumers and employers pick health plans, some increasingly are being offered a trade-off these days: They can get a hefty break on their premiums if they agree to pay more out-of-pocket when they use certain high-cost providers in their network or if they cut those providers out of their n...

Hospital, union brace for nurses' strike
Managers at Washington Hospital Center and the nurses union are bracing for a planned strike Friday at the region's largest hospital, with managers flying in replacement nurses from all across the country and nurses seeking support from city officials.

Republicans shift focus to Medicaid complaints
A day after President Obama said he would support amending the health-care law so states can opt out of key provisions sooner, Republicans sought to shift the rhetorical battle back to an issue that would be largely unaffected by the president's proposal: the impact of the law's Medicaid requirem...

Can't judge an exercise book by its cover
Crack open a copy of "The Men's Health Big Book of Exercises: Four Weeks to a Leaner, Stronger, More Muscular You!" and you'll find a compilation of 619 moves designed to work every muscle in your body. If you thought you'd see anything all that different inside "The Women's Health Big Book of Ex...

How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.

The Checklist: Fitness and nutrition advice for March
March is my pudgiest month. Winter has made it challenging to get to the gym or outside for regular runs. But now spring is nigh (it officially starts March 20!), and shorts-wearing weather can't be far behind. So now's the time to start getting in shape for the warm months ahead. I will if you w...

Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...

D.C. Health Department issues measles alert
A woman infected with measles, a contagious and potentially dangerous disease, traveled through the District and Maryland after flying into Dulles International Airport, it was disclosed Monday.

Obama says he will support letting states opt out of health-care law earlier
President Obama told a group of governors Monday that he would support moving up the timetable in which states can opt out of the federal health care law, making a major concession to critics of the law.

Patients find plenty of health information on line, but not all of it is reliable
The Internet has no equal as an information storehouse. The trick is to know how to get right to a source of useful information and not waste time on Web sites that are biased, trying to sell you something or just plain wrong.

Medical Mysteries: A Teen's Swollen Ankle
Shortly after Thanksgiving 2009, 14-year-old old Abby Picard began complaining that her right ankle hurt. Her parents brushed it off, believing her discomfort was the result of her fondness for fashionable thin-soled sneakers and an extremely heavy backpack. "We thought nothing of it," recalled h...

Mobile dental clinic brings care to poor children in Prince George's County
At last, dentist Belinda Carver-Taylor was sitting in the new mobile dental clinic with a child before her. She had hoped for this day so long that now she could only shake her head.

Governors differ on extent of flexibility for Medicaid
Democratic and Republican governors, burdened by crushing budget pressures from Medicaid, said Sunday that federal officials should allow them more freedom to change eligibility rules and other aspects of the public health insurance program for the poor. But they displayed sharp ideological diffe...

The Checkup: More questions about cell phone safety
Are cell phones safe? That question has gotten a lot of attention, but so far, as my colleague pointed out on Monday, there has been no convincing evidence that those ubiquitous devices actually cause health problems. However, a new federal study may stir things up further, even though the bottom...

Obama administration asks states to cut costs without dropping Medicaid coverage
The Obama administration is deploying squadrons of in-house experts to help budget-strapped states figure out how to save money on Medicaid, the health program for the poor that has been a source of rising tensions between state capitals and Washington.

Whole grain and the 2010 Dietary Guidelines
It's no secret that whole grains are good for us. They deliver way more nutrients per calorie than refined grains do, which just happens to fall in line with one of the major themes of the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 (published by the U.S. Agriculture and Health and Human Services d...

Hospitals aim to reduce the number of patients readmitted after discharge
"Welcome back" are two words you'd really rather not hear at a hospital, especially if you've just been discharged. Yet one in five Medicare patients found themselves back in the hospital within 30 days of leaving it in 2003 and 2004, according to a recent study in the New England Journal of Medi...

I cannot tell a lie: Racing Presidents tryout isn't easy
I had to be Teddy. Nothing else would make sense. This is, after all, a fitness column, and any high school history student can tell you which U.S. president is most closely linked with "the life of strenuous endeavor," as Roosevelt liked to put it himself.

Flu season heats up
Don't let the warmer, brighter days fool you. Flu season is not over.

Fiber seems to be linked to a reduced risk of disease in people older than 50
THE QUESTION: Diets high in fiber have been shown to aid weight loss and help with digestive problems. Might fiber also offer other health benefits?

'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...

Bacteria's role in colon cancer, cystic fibrosis; burning paper to measure carbon
Here's a not-so-savory news flash: There are more bacterial cells living in our bodies than human cells. Researchers are learning how the balance of these bugs affects our health, but reaping the benefits of bacteria is not quite as simple as eating probiotic yogurt. That's the gist of "The Good,...

Google, Yahoo! BabelFish use math principles to translate documents online
Early one morning in 2007, Libby Casey was trying to do her laundry in a guesthouse in Reykjavik, Iceland. When she couldn't figure out how to use the washing machine, she opened up the instruction manual.

An insomniac learns to make the most of getting the least sleep
In the wee hours of the morning - or is it still night? - my eyes snap open and my mind races. What do I have to do today? What didn't I get done yesterday? Why did I get into that disagreement? Other nights, I am on a high wire, hovering between sleep and wakefulness and chewing over my next mov...

Can relaxation drinks put you to sleep?
Once, "relaxation beverages" consisted of alcohol, chamomile tea and warm milk. Now, the field includes a slew of new drinks promising a better night's sleep using such ingredients as melatonin, valerian root and - think turkey - tryptophan.

Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?

Free app adjusts color on monitors to prevent disruption of sleep cycle
I stare at screens almost every waking hour. Computer monitor. Laptop. TV. Tablet. Smartphone. So I've tested a few ways to ease the strain on my eyes - and, in the process, learned about something that might be helping me in non-waking hours, too. It's about the light that these screens emit. It...

Obama administration unlikely to block Arizona plan to cut 250,000 from Medicaid rolls
The administration will probably permit the plan despite a provision in the new health-care law barring states from tightening their eligibility standards for the program, federal officials said.

The sports bra: Your No. 1 supporter
Everyone has a pair of feet, but women have an additional pair of something to worry about while exercising. And they're every bit as tricky to fit, control and protect, which is why bras are beginning to rival shoes as the most technical of all sporting apparel.

Z drugs keep sleep-aid market awake
With almost a third of Americans reporting sleep problems, it's not surprising that sales of Ambien, Sonata and similar sleep aids are high: It's a $1.8 billion market.

Study of recalled medical devices faults lax FDA testing methods
A new analysis is raising questions about how good a job the Food and Drug Administration is doing at protecting Americans from faulty medical devices.

Meditation and mindfulness may give your brain a boost
They are the simplest instructions in the world: Sit in a comfortable position, close your eyes, clear your mind and try to focus on the present moment. Yet I am confident that anyone who has tried meditation will agree with me that what seems so basic and easy on paper is often incredibly challe...

Humor, music and spirituality may offer physical benefits
Humor, music and spirituality can boost your mood, but growing evidence suggests that they also offer physical benefits.

Group tries to simplify drug labels to help people get the proper doses
"Take two tablets by mouth twice daily." This printed instruction, common on prescription pill bottles, might seem straightforward. Yet in a study, nearly half of patients misunderstood what it or other common label instructions meant.

Book explains allergies, asthma; magazine rates teen TV shows for safe-sex info
POZ, the lifestyle magazine for people with HIV/AIDS, evaluated a variety of teen TV shows for how often characters practiced safe sex.New book discusses allergies and asthma in children.

Apps and gadgets to track your sleep
A bunch of gadgets and apps are now on the market to help high-tech insomniacs (or just the sleep-curious) track their z's. These aren't meant to help you fall asleep, though there are plenty of other apps intended to do that. We're talking here about gizmos that claim to record your movements al...

Too little or too much sleep may take a toll on the heart
Quick Study: Too little or too much sleep may take a toll on the heart.

Tattooing outgrows its renegade image to thrive in the mainstream
It's 1945, and you want a tattoo. You drive to the part of town your mom warned you about, past scruffy bars and burlesque shows, and arrive at a tiny shop offering maybe 200 designs in three or four colors. An ex-sailor who just clocked out of his day job rinses off his tattoo machine. Five minu...

Insuring your health: Book argues against unnecessary medical intervention
In a new book, "Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health," Dartmouth researchers and physicians H. Gilbert Welch, Lisa Schwartz and Steven Woloshin argue that the medical establishment's embrace of early diagnosis and treatment as the key to keeping people healthy actually does ...

2010 was marked by a recall of eggs, drug warnings and progress on flu vaccines
Consumer Reports Insights: 2010 was marked by a recall of eggs, drug warnings and progress on flu vaccines.

Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.

FlyScreen Lands On iPhone But Not As We Know It
FlyScreen , the lock screen replacement for Android and Symbian phones from Israeli startup Cellogic, has landed on the iPhone . But not as we know it.That's because Apple's iOS is locked down as it were (see what I did there) and doesn't allow third-party apps to take over the lock screen. This...

D.C.'s leading provider of clean needles to drug addicts to close Feb. 25
The leading provider of clean needles to drug addicts in the District to help stem the spread of AIDS plans to shut its doors by the end of the month, officials said Wednesday, in the city that has the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence rate in the country.

Study: Surgery in womb helps babies with spina bifida
Performing surgery on babies with the most severe form of spina bifida when they are still in the womb doubles the chance that they will be able to walk, according to a federally funded study released Wednesday.

Breast-cancer study questions lymph node removal
Many women with early breast cancer do not appear to need removal of their lymph nodes, as is often recommended, according to a federally funded study released Tuesday.

Want to be one of the Nationals' racing presidents?
Applications are due Friday for those interested in becoming one of the Washington Nationals' racing presidents: Abe, George, Tom or Teddy, right. The mascots are starting their sixth year of entertaining home crowds with a race on the field during the fourth inning.

The February wellness checklist
February's long winter slog is brightened by Valentine's Day, a good reminder to take care of our hearts. Here are some ideas for being well during this shortest, and often snowiest, of months in Washington.


When injuries interrupt exercise: Readers weigh in
I got some great feedback on my Jan. 27 column about the sudden interruption to my running regimen, "Coping with an out-of-the-routine injury." Here are edited excerpts of what two readers had to say, followed by excerpts from an online Q&A nutritional biochemist Shawn Talbott and I did with ...

'Why We Get Fat' by Gary Taubes; teen smoking prevention online
Once more, with feeling "Why We Get Fat" (Knopf, $24.95)

Health benefits of falling and staying in love
Love may make the world go 'round, but is it powerful enough to lower one's blood pressure, reduce depression and speed the healing of an injury? With Valentine's Day just around the corner, we set out to find the answer and discovered that science says yes.

Getting a tattoo is largely safe, though experts advise using a reputable shop
Dermatologists' organizations, tattoo artists and the Food and Drug Administration agree that tattooing is largely safe, but any time you stick a needle into skin there are risks. Consumers need to do their homework.

Military personnel take extreme measures to meet body-fat and weight rules
Air Force Tech. Sgt. Heather Sommerdyke spent $12,000 on two liposuction surgeries last spring. She was running eight to 10 miles, six days a week. She even switched to a starvation diet. It was all part of a last-ditch effort to trim her waistline to the 35.5-inch maximum for female airmen. She ...

Mediation can bring justice with no need for a trial
When a health-care provider harms instead of heals, patients who seek answers and redress generally face the prospect of a long and costly lawsuit. But there's another option, one that can significantly reduce the toll of a court battle while providing many of the same benefits to patients and th...

New dietary guidelines: Eat less, eat better and lose the salt
Americans need to make big changes in their eating habits to fight the obesity epidemic and a host of ailments caused by poor diets, including consuming less sugar, fat and salt and more fish, fruits and vegetables, the Obama administration recommended Monday.

Report on global cardiac risks: World gets fatter, but blood pressure goes down
The whole world is getting fatter, except perhaps for the women of Italy and Singapore. Globally, blood pressure is slowly coming down. Cholesterol is falling in rich countries and rising in developing ones.

State officials divided on meaning of judge's health-care ruling
A day after a federal judge struck down the government's plan to overhaul the health-care system, Wisconsin Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen issued a stern statement: "This means that, for Wisconsin, the federal health care law is dead," and that his state "was relieved of any obligations or duti...

No chilling effect on donations at the Polar Bear Plunge
Much to the chagrin of the proudly purple people of Baltimore, the Ravens will not be playing in the Super Bowl on Sunday.

Super thin Super Bowl spread
Like other food-centered celebrations, Super Bowl gatherings can be both fun and fraught with apprehension for those concerned about their waistlines. Nobody wants to sit on the sidelines, skipping the traditional snacks. But who wants to deal with postgame regrets? You can work football-fan food...

Health information remains high on the list of popular uses for the Internet
Seeking health information is the third-most-prevalent activity among American Internet users, according to a report being issued Feb. 1 by the Pew Internet Project. The only things more universal were exchanging e-mail and using search engines. (Of course, if someone uses Google to look up "shin...

Liposuction can't salvage Navy career
KEY WEST, FLA. - Mick Kruger is not out of shape. The 38-year-old master-at-arms first class has never failed a physical readiness test. He routinely scores "excellent" on the mile-and-a-half run. He has run one marathon and finished three others on in-line skates. His performance evaluations du...

AnyBody: Parents are ignoring their children for their BlackBerry
Increasingly, it is adults' constant, obsessive use of these technologies that's coming under fire.

Judge strikes down entire new health-care law
A federal judge in Florida on Monday became the first to strike down the entire law to overhaul the nation's health-care system, potentially complicating implementation of the statute in the 26 states that brought the suit.

House Republicans sharpen attack on health-care reform in two Hill hearings
Republicans on Wednesday used their new majority in the House of Representatives to hold the first of what they promise will be a steady drumbeat of congressional hearings to denounce the new health-care law.

Nutritional information: Milk
Sales of whole milk in the United States made up about 70 percent of the market in the mid-1970s but have dropped dramatically since, while the sales of skim and 2 percent have risen. The most recent sales figures show:

Got milk? What kind?
After spending a day with her boyfriend's family recently, my daughter marveled, "They only drink whole milk!" That milk was delicious, she reported, even after the container had sat on the counter for a while.

U.S. recovers $4 billion from health-care fraud cases
The government recaptured a record $4 billion last year from pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, doctors, nursing homes and other providers of care that defrauded federal health-care programs, the Obama administration reported Monday.

First "Elvis of Asia" contest kicks off in Manila
Elvis Presley fans from around the world paid tribute to the 40th death anniversary of the King of Rock and Roll in the first annual "Elvis of Asia" contest. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

When in bad health, China's pets turn to acupuncture
A rising number of pet owners in China are turning to alternative therapy and Chinese medicine to cure their animals' ailments.

Drivers brave wacky 24 hour race
It may not look like your standard Formula 1 event, but Britain's 24 hour Citroen 2CV race requires serious skill and endurance. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

Croatia's only beach bar for dogs
Croatia's only beach bar catering for dogs staged a race in the Adriatic on Sunday for owners and their four legged friends. Rough cut (no reporter narration).

Filmmakers prep for quick eclipse scenes, no second takes
Producers of independent films and TV ads are fanning across U.S. states to capture what they hope will be unique scenes using the natural spectacle of Monday's total solar eclipse.

O.J. Simpson LA exhibit shows memorabilia as art
More than 20 years after the so-called Trial of the Century, an art exhibit examines the public's enduring fascination with O.J. Simpson during his sensational arrest and murder trial. Ben Gruber reports.

O.J. Simpson LA exhibit shows memorabilia as art
More than 20 years after the so-called Trial of the Century, an art exhibit examines the public's enduring fascination with O.J. Simpson during his sensational arrest and murder trial. Ben Gruber reports.

Bolivia's police dogs get honored for their anti-drug work
Fifteen police dogs that work for the country's anti-drug unit are honored on the Catholic feast day of San Roque on Tuesday.

Long-lost ring reemerges...on a carrot
Eighty-four year-old Mary Grams has been reunited with her long-lost engagement ring which, earlier this week, was found wrapped around a carrot in her Alberta, Canada vegetable patch. Jillian Kitchener reports.

London's female wrestling scene boosted by Netflix show 'Glow'
There has been more interest in female wrestling and a clearer sense of what it involves since hit Netlfix show 'Glow' came out. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

Woman finds long-lost engagement ring on garden's carrot
A woman finds her engagement ring on a carrot after losing it while gardening 13 years ago. Rough cut (no reporter narration).

Cheetos-themed restaurant opens for three days in NYC
"Cheetos make everyone happy," says celebrity chef Anne Burrell, who created the 11-item menu for The Spotted Cheetah. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Feline fans celebrate all things kitty at CatCon
Thousands of cat enthusiasts gathered on Sunday (August 13) for the third annual CatCon convention, a celebration of all things feline. Edward Baran reports.

Bladerunners: UK lawnmowers in 12-hour endurance race
Drivers donned their suits and climbed into their cockpits at the weekend for a 12-hour endurance race with a difference: they weren't driving rallying cars, but lawnmowers. Edward Baran reports.

More than 100 Pikachus parade in Japan as fans cheer on
Pokemon Go fans watch Pikachu parade in Japanese city. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Oregon coastal city ready to be first in welcoming the eclipse
Residents of Depoe Bay, Oregon, are gearing up to be the first U.S. city see the upcoming Great American Eclipse. Nathan Frandino reports.

Revellers enjoy brass band festival in Guca, Serbia
The 57h Guca Brass Band Festival, Serbia's liveliest traditional music event, has attracted tens of thousands of people crowding the streets and savouring the trumpet beat. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

Mongolians protest as bulldozers threaten Beatles monument
A statue of the Beatles in the Mongolian capital of Ulaanbaatar could be at risk amid an alleged land grab, protesters say, as rapid development turns a city once famed for wide open spaces into a cluttered metropolis. Grace Lee reports.

Tired of daily commute, German man swims to work
Benjamin David swims across River Isar every day in order to avoid the congested streets of Munich.

Inflatable Trump chicken spotted outside White House
An inflatable chicken with Trump-like hair was spotted outside the White House on Wednesday. Activist Taran Singh Brar says its a visual statement showing that President Trump is too afraid to release his tax returns, stand up to Russian President Vladimir Putin and is playing a 'game of Chicken' with North Korea. Colette Luke reports.

Cuban graffiti artists go up the walls in Havana
As Cuba is opening up, young graffiti artists climb up the walls of Havana to express their thoughts and feelings. Elly Park reports.

Tensions rise in dispute over Kenya election results
Kenyans took to the streets of the capital in protest over Tuesday's presidential election result which the opposition party claimed was rigged. Rough cut (no reporter narration).

Orangutan with sign language skills dies at Atlanta zoo
Zoo officials say Chantek, a male orangutan who was among the first apes to learn sign language, could clean his room and memorized the way to a fast-food restaurant, has died. Jillian Kitchener reports.

Orangutan with sign language skills dies at Atlanta zoo
Zoo officials say Chantek, a male orangutan who was among the first apes to learn sign language, could clean his room and memorized the way to a fast-food restaurant, has died. Jillian Kitchener reports.

London's underground mail rail re-opens after 14 years
A never seen before underground mail network is set to open to public in London, 14 years after it closed down. Rosanna Philpott reports.

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It's been five years since NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover landed on the red planet on August 6, 2012. The rover survived the much-publicized "seven minutes of terror" and safely landed near Mount Sharp. The rover accomplished its main goal in less than a year, collecting a rock sample that shows ancient Mars could supported living microbes.

Japan is building the fastest supercomputer in the world
Japan is building the world's fastest supercomputer, which it hopes will make the country the new global hub for artificial intelligence research.

Ingrem, a Chinese company has created the "husband pod," an arcade booth intended to stave off boredom for men who accompany their partners to the mall.

Scientists have figured out how to grow organs from skin cells. CNN's Rachel Crane explores a lab that is using this technique to revolutionize cancer treatments.

A security robot named Steve plunged down four steps into a fountain in Washington, leading to its watery demise.

Meet GuardBot, a spherical surveillance vehicle that can swim upstream. CNN's Thom Patterson explains how the military hopes to use it.

Zero gravity, fully cute: New Japanese drone in space
The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency has released the first set of images and videos taken by its debut zero-gravity camera drone or "Int-Ball," the cute orb of a drone, will optimize communication between crew in space and on Earth.

Researchers at the University of Washington demonstrate new techniques to turn audio clips into realistic video, using clips from President Obama's speeches.

Every July, some of the world's most wealthy and powerful businesspeople meet in Sun Valley, Idaho, for an exclusive weeklong conference.

Beneath its heavy cloud cover, Jupiter has been able to keep its secrets from astronomers. Now, first results from NASA's Juno mission are challenging researchers' beliefs about the gas giant.

While speaking to CNN's Laurie Segall, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Cheryl Yeoh says she was sexually assaulted by her investor.

In Hong Kong, two engineers have created a smart bicycle helmet with integrated brake and turn-signal lights.

Michaela Pereira and John Berman talk to Brett Larson and Michael Fertik about a new study focused on internet trolling.

'Satellite catcher' will use magnets to clean up space junk
Japanese scientists are developing a system to capture and remove space debris.

How Japan is reinventing the future of energy
Right now, Japan imports 84% of its energy, but all over the country scientists are busy innovating with the goal of changing this.

How Japan is reinventing the automobile
The future of the car in Japan is not just about what we will drive but also how we will power it.

Revolutionary developments around the world might mean that life in space for the masses could soon become a reality.