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Shia LaBeouf pleads guilty to obstruction charge in July arrest
Actor Shia LaBeouf sentenced to probation after pleading guilty to public obstuction charges related to his July arrest. Ben Gruber reports.

Playboy's first transgender 'playmate' hopes to 'pave way for all women'
Ines Rau becomes the first transgender person to appear as a Playboy centerfold. Roselle Chen reports.

Jan Fabre brings 'Belgian Rules' to Russia
Famous visual artist Jan Fabre presents his fresh performance 'Belgian Rules/Belgium Rules' in Moscow. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Midnight parties held for Philip Pullman's latest book
After a gap of 17 years, Philip Pullman's follow-up to his globally-acclaimed 'His Dark Materials' trilogy is released in the UK. David Doyle reports.

Ed Sheeran 'bruised and broken' after accident, tour uncertain
Ed Sheeran tells reporters at the Q Awards in London that he is "a bit bruised and broken" after a bicycle accident. ROUGH CUT - no reporter narration.

Harry Potter exhibition blends wizardry with history
Rare memorabilia from the creation of the Harry Potter books by J.K.Rowling go on display at the British Library in London. Rough Cut - no reporter narration.

Latvian dancer, Senegal singer receive Japan's Praemium Imperiale awards
Ballet dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov and Senegalese artist Youssou N'Dour, along with others, received Japan's Praemium Imperiale awards. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

A ticket with the pleb's-eye-view of the Colosseum, please!
For the first time in decades, the top floors of the Colosseum built to host gladiatorial contests nearly 2,000 years ago have opened for small groups of visitors. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Luis Fonsi, Lin-Manuel Miranda raise funds for disaster relief
The stars of Puerto Rican descent perform at Tidal X, a charity concert to raise funds for disaster relief. Elly Park reports.

Tom Hanks signs his book in New York
The Oscar winner gets casual with fans in New York as he signs his first book "Uncommon Type." Rough Cut (No reporter narration).

London design awards reflect a year of political upheaval and social change
Sixty-two nominations for the annual Beazley Design Awards go on show at the London Design Museum, with prominent themes including U.S. protests and the migrant crisis. David Doyle reports.

Abuse of power dominates Iannucci satire at London premiere
Michael Palin and Andrea Riseborough amongst stars on the red carpet in London for the UK premiere of 'The Death of Stalin'. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

Weinstein scandal a "watershed moment": Gretchen Carlson
Former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson, who successfully sued the late Roger Ailes for sexual harrassment, says the Harvey Weinstein scandal is a "watershed moment" for women. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Female stars celebrate change in Hollywood
During the 'Elle Women in Hollywood' awards actresses speak about a possible new beginning in Hollywood . Sarah Mills reports.

WWE signs first woman wrestler from the Arab world
World Wrestling Entertainment signed its first female performer from the Arab world on Sunday, smashing cultural taboos as the U.S.-based sport seeks to piledrive its way into lucrative foreign markets. Lisa Bernhard reports.

British autistic artist Stephen Wiltshire signs finished drawing of NYC skyline
Wiltshire has an eidetic memory that allows him to recall every detail of a city from one 45-minute helicopter ride. The artist says drawing the New York City skyline was "truly hard work." Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Stars of female-led story talk about sexism in Hollywood
As Hollywood struggles with sexism, female-led story ends London Film Festival. Rough Cut (No reporter narration).

Film Academy votes to expel Harvey Weinstein
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announces their decision to expel producer Harvey Weinstein, after allegations that he sexually harassed or assaulted a number of women over the past three decades. Weinstein denies having non-consensual sex with anyone. Jillian Kitchener reports.

American Music Awards nominations released
Bruno Mars leads music's AMA nominations as female artists edged out. Ben Gruber reports.

Eminem rebukes 'racist' Donald Trump in awards show rap
Eminem derides U.S. President Donald Trump as a racist and a reckless leader in a rap video. Rough cut (no reporter narration).

New London production of musical "Hair" given a little re-style to fit the age of Trump
Popular musical "Hair" celebrates its fiftieth anniversary with a Trump-influenced relaunch in London. Jane Witherspoon reports

Zombies immortalized at the Smithsonian museum
Cast of AMC's hit show "The Walking Dead" make an appearance at the Smithsonian museum in Washington D.C to celebrate the donation event. Elly Park reports.

Stars of 'Thor: Ragnarok' walk the red carpet at world premiere
New film 'Thor: Ragnorak' premiers in Los Angeles as its stars Chris Hemsworth, Tessa Thompson and Cate Blanchett walked the red carpet. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

Guillermo del Toro presents his Golden Lion winning film 'The Shape of Water' in London
Mexican film director, Guillermo del Toro, presented his new film 'The Shape Of Water' on the red carpet in London as part of the city's Film Festival. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

Jane Goodall celebrated in Hollywood
Jane Goodall, who became world renowned for her study of chimpanzees' behavior in the wild, is guest of honor at the Hollywood Bowl premiere of the documentary "Jane". Rough Cut - no reporter narration.

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A pool with airport tarmac views

The Italian town paying people to move there
The mayor of Italian town Candela has come up with a practical solution to its dwindling population number -- paying people to become residents.

Aboard a 1938 flight from London to Australia

$20,000 a night: Swanky penthouse suites

The ultimate volcano adventure
Volcanoes from the air and on the ground, plus a night at an exclusive Hawaii hideaway. The Four Seasons Hualalai if offering an awe-inspiring helicopter adventure.

Volcanoes and valleys on the Big Island
The youngest of Hawaii's main islands -- and it's still growing, with over 500 acres of new land added over the last 30 years -- the Big Island of Hawai'i overflows with outdoor adventures. Here you can hike to the edge of the world's longest-running volcanic eruption, then climb Hawaii's two tallest peaks.

They purchased paradise ... then gave it all away
This is the story of the couple who purchased paradise, the neighbors who curse their name and the idea that might save life as we know it.

Laps of luxury: 17 jaw-dropping pools around the world
Diving in at the deep end has never been more enjoyable than in these jaw-dropping pools.

Johannesburg gaining on its stunner of a sibling city
Arriving at the Saxon Hotel requires a series of grand entrances: the imposing 20-foot gate through the high walls that separate the grounds from Johannesburg's suburban expanse; the meandering drive through the lush gardens; the foyer to the hotel with its enormous ostrich egg chandelier.

Wake up to wildlife: Asia's best luxury tented camps
The glamping trend has swept through Asia, with new luxury tented camps setting up in the region's most pristine locations.

Why Detroit's city storyteller wants to ban the word 'gritty'
I can't stand the term "gritty" when it's used to describe my hometown and my residence of Detroit. It's empty. It's lost all meaning. It's an overused term that, far too often, simplifies this city to an easily digestible narrative when there are several storylines here.

9 luxurious fall escapes
Upon arrival at the Old Edwards Inn in North Carolina, you'll be greeted with a complimentary glass of champagne.

Seattle's best architecture: Beyond the Space Needle
Seattle is a city on the edge. So much of Seattle's recent history is about pushing boundaries, from music to art to technology.

Painting on planes: Stunning sketches of airplane life
What did you do on your last plane journey? Fall asleep, watch a movie, draft some emails?

What to do and where to eat in Central Park
Manhattan might be best known for its towering skyscrapers and bustling pavement, but there are few New York City locales more loved than the 843 acres of green that is Central Park.

31 must-see places around the world
Temples that tower out of mist-cloaked jungles; a herd of wildebeest, one million-strong, trekking across the African plains; a midnight sky filled with stars.

Sicily's Aeolian islands: Where heaven meets hell
Locals call them the "shape-shifting" or "floating" islands.

Some good tips before you visit the London Eye

Kakadu: Never-before-seen views of Australia's largest national park
For the first time, drones have been allowed to fly inside Kakadu National Park -- Australia's largest national park and a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Northern Territory.

'Wonder List' in the Galapagos: How do Darwin's theories hold up today?
The rocks are moving.

Sketching the shipwrecks of Brunei
When it comes to odd jobs, Anuar Abdullah's might top the list.

Scents on a plane: Why the aviation industry is waking up to fragrance
Ever walked past the open door of a bakery, caught the scent of warm cinnamon rolls, and been transported back to your mother's kitchen?

The best things to do in Goa
Goa has been indelibly shaped by its 450 years of Portuguese rule, followed by an influx of hippies in the 1960s.

5 places where cats outshine tourist attractions
Since when were a bunch of kids so interested in ancient history?

Could rare sea turtles return to China's Hainan Island?
The sun was blazing on the white sand of Dadonghai Bay when Stanley, an endangered green sea turtle, was slowly lowered back into the ocean to begin his new life.

World's best airport swimming pools
From the "therapeutic" pool at DFW to Changi's rooftop pool in Singapore, here are some of the best airport swimming pools worldwide.

'World's smallest hotel' created in VW Beetle
The owner says guests of his tiny hotel -- a converted Volkswagen Beetle in the Jordan village of Al Jaya -- will enjoy a five-star desert experience.

The renovated old Volkswagen Beetle is parked on the side of the road in a semi-deserted village in Jordan, overlooking the ancient castle in Jordan.

All before us is ice. Stretching out for miles there's nothing but a vast barrier of white. A frozen sea, more than 30 stories tall, as menacing as it is beautiful.

The great calving glacier of Eqi, Greenland
Eqi glacier leaves visitors to this part of Greenland thunderstruck each time another piece crashes off into the sea.

washingtonpost.com

Researchers try to understand naked mole rats' resistance to cancer
With their pinkish, translucent and wrinkly skin, double-saber buck teeth and black-bead eyes, naked mole rats look like characters in a nightmare from hell. In fact, they do live underground in pitch-dark burrows where their air, from a human point of view, can contain chokingly little oxygen, t...

Doctors try new models to push health insurers aside
Just about everyone agrees that the way we pay for primary care needs fixing. Under the current insurance model, doctors get paid for procedures and tests rather than for time spent with patients, which displeases doctors and patients alike and increases costs. Now some medical practices are side...

Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare beneficiaries
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...

Breathless, but not from asthma

Fish and seafood recipe recommendations
Jennifer LaRue Huget offers some suggestions

Fish and seafood recipes
How much fish and seafood should you eat each week? What are some good recipes?

Inside the new Dietary Guidelines: Fish and other seafood
Jennifer LaRue Huget explains how best to incorporate the new dietary guidelines on seafood into your diet.

Parenting an overweight child can be difficult
Should they intervene early and practice a form of benign neglect, hoping that the baby fat will melt away as a child grows?

Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.

Surgeon general says obesity crisis should be addressed together
Surgeon general says obesity crisis should be addressed together.

Wisconsin's health-care fight illustrates challenges as states change leadership
After President Obama signed the nation's health-care overhaul into law, Wisconsin made more headway than virtually anywhere else in the country at preparing to carry the statute out. Then a Republican governor came to power and changed all that.

Drums Alive: Feel the beat, feel the burn
Could Drums Alive be the next Zumba? Vicky Hallett explores Baltimore's latest exercise craze.

Top green vegetables for your health -- and St. Patrick's Day
Get in the spirit with these top five green vegetables.

Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant

An incomplete story was published to this webpage. We apologize for the confusion and inconvenience. Please find our latest coverage at washingtonpost.com

Radiation exposure poses range of potential health problems for Japanese
Among other things, radiation from nuclear power plants could increase cancer rates for decades.

Nurses' strike cost Washington Hospital Center $6 million
Washington Hospital Center spent about $6 million to hire 600 temporary nurses, beef up security and cover other costs during last week's nurses' strike and subsequent lockout at the region's largest hospital, hospital officials said.

Report reveals steep increase in war amputations last fall
The majority of American soldiers undergoing amputation for war wounds last fall lost more than one limb, according to data presented Tuesday to the Defense Health Board, a committee of experts that advises the Defense Department on medical matters.

More information about ranch dressing
The original, handmade batches of buttermilk dressing were made in the mid-1950s by Steve Henson at his Hidden Valley Ranch near Santa Barbara, Calif. Buttermilk is now the sixth ingredient in the Hidden Valley full-fat dressing, after soybean oil, water, egg yolk, sugar and salt; it's third on t...

March madness? A basketball league that doesn't keep score
I recently spent a couple of hours at the Jewish Community Center in Fairfax watching women in their 40s, 50s and 60s play two games of full-court basketball. These were rec-league ballplayers, but there was nothing casual about the games. They played organized zone defense. A ref in black and wh...

Ranch dressing: How good is it for you?
Is ranch dressing the best way to get kids to eat their vegetables?

Milestones in the eradication of smallpox
With officials debating whether to destroy the remaining specimens of the pathogen, here is a look at notable dates in smallpox history:

Should last remaining known smallpox virus die?
Intense debate rages over whether to destroy the remaining laboratory specimens of the smallpox virus.

Smart food choices can cut excess sugar and empty calories from your diet
The average U.S. adult consumes about a half-cup of added sugar a day, which amounts to roughly 355 nutritionally empty calories.

Paperbacks discuss antidepressants and technology's role in marriage
Irving Kirsch's describes "The Emperor's New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth." Spouses Edward M. Hallowell and Sue George Hallowell explain how technology leaves people "Married to Distraction."

Children seem to gain extra weight after having their tonsils removed
A study analyzes data from nine studies, involving 795 children who had a tonsillectomy, with or without adenoid removal, before they turned 18.

Vitamin D deficiency may be a factor in development of allergies
Young people low in Vitamin D may be more prone to allergies, according to a new study.

Doctor-owned centers spark criticism, scrutiny
When Kenneth Baker found out he had prostate cancer, his urologist detailed his options: The 84-year-old was too old for surgery, but he could pick from two forms of radiation or simply wait to see if he really needed treatment.

Health insurers offer patients the option of paying extra for higher-priced care
When consumers and employers pick health plans, some increasingly are being offered a trade-off these days: They can get a hefty break on their premiums if they agree to pay more out-of-pocket when they use certain high-cost providers in their network or if they cut those providers out of their n...

Hospital, union brace for nurses' strike
Managers at Washington Hospital Center and the nurses union are bracing for a planned strike Friday at the region's largest hospital, with managers flying in replacement nurses from all across the country and nurses seeking support from city officials.

Republicans shift focus to Medicaid complaints
A day after President Obama said he would support amending the health-care law so states can opt out of key provisions sooner, Republicans sought to shift the rhetorical battle back to an issue that would be largely unaffected by the president's proposal: the impact of the law's Medicaid requirem...

Can't judge an exercise book by its cover
Crack open a copy of "The Men's Health Big Book of Exercises: Four Weeks to a Leaner, Stronger, More Muscular You!" and you'll find a compilation of 619 moves designed to work every muscle in your body. If you thought you'd see anything all that different inside "The Women's Health Big Book of Ex...

How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.

The Checklist: Fitness and nutrition advice for March
March is my pudgiest month. Winter has made it challenging to get to the gym or outside for regular runs. But now spring is nigh (it officially starts March 20!), and shorts-wearing weather can't be far behind. So now's the time to start getting in shape for the warm months ahead. I will if you w...

Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...

D.C. Health Department issues measles alert
A woman infected with measles, a contagious and potentially dangerous disease, traveled through the District and Maryland after flying into Dulles International Airport, it was disclosed Monday.

Obama says he will support letting states opt out of health-care law earlier
President Obama told a group of governors Monday that he would support moving up the timetable in which states can opt out of the federal health care law, making a major concession to critics of the law.

Patients find plenty of health information on line, but not all of it is reliable
The Internet has no equal as an information storehouse. The trick is to know how to get right to a source of useful information and not waste time on Web sites that are biased, trying to sell you something or just plain wrong.

Medical Mysteries: A Teen's Swollen Ankle
Shortly after Thanksgiving 2009, 14-year-old old Abby Picard began complaining that her right ankle hurt. Her parents brushed it off, believing her discomfort was the result of her fondness for fashionable thin-soled sneakers and an extremely heavy backpack. "We thought nothing of it," recalled h...

Mobile dental clinic brings care to poor children in Prince George's County
At last, dentist Belinda Carver-Taylor was sitting in the new mobile dental clinic with a child before her. She had hoped for this day so long that now she could only shake her head.

Governors differ on extent of flexibility for Medicaid
Democratic and Republican governors, burdened by crushing budget pressures from Medicaid, said Sunday that federal officials should allow them more freedom to change eligibility rules and other aspects of the public health insurance program for the poor. But they displayed sharp ideological diffe...

The Checkup: More questions about cell phone safety
Are cell phones safe? That question has gotten a lot of attention, but so far, as my colleague pointed out on Monday, there has been no convincing evidence that those ubiquitous devices actually cause health problems. However, a new federal study may stir things up further, even though the bottom...

Obama administration asks states to cut costs without dropping Medicaid coverage
The Obama administration is deploying squadrons of in-house experts to help budget-strapped states figure out how to save money on Medicaid, the health program for the poor that has been a source of rising tensions between state capitals and Washington.

Whole grain and the 2010 Dietary Guidelines
It's no secret that whole grains are good for us. They deliver way more nutrients per calorie than refined grains do, which just happens to fall in line with one of the major themes of the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 (published by the U.S. Agriculture and Health and Human Services d...

Hospitals aim to reduce the number of patients readmitted after discharge
"Welcome back" are two words you'd really rather not hear at a hospital, especially if you've just been discharged. Yet one in five Medicare patients found themselves back in the hospital within 30 days of leaving it in 2003 and 2004, according to a recent study in the New England Journal of Medi...

I cannot tell a lie: Racing Presidents tryout isn't easy
I had to be Teddy. Nothing else would make sense. This is, after all, a fitness column, and any high school history student can tell you which U.S. president is most closely linked with "the life of strenuous endeavor," as Roosevelt liked to put it himself.

Flu season heats up
Don't let the warmer, brighter days fool you. Flu season is not over.

Fiber seems to be linked to a reduced risk of disease in people older than 50
THE QUESTION: Diets high in fiber have been shown to aid weight loss and help with digestive problems. Might fiber also offer other health benefits?

'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...

Bacteria's role in colon cancer, cystic fibrosis; burning paper to measure carbon
Here's a not-so-savory news flash: There are more bacterial cells living in our bodies than human cells. Researchers are learning how the balance of these bugs affects our health, but reaping the benefits of bacteria is not quite as simple as eating probiotic yogurt. That's the gist of "The Good,...

Google, Yahoo! BabelFish use math principles to translate documents online
Early one morning in 2007, Libby Casey was trying to do her laundry in a guesthouse in Reykjavik, Iceland. When she couldn't figure out how to use the washing machine, she opened up the instruction manual.

An insomniac learns to make the most of getting the least sleep
In the wee hours of the morning - or is it still night? - my eyes snap open and my mind races. What do I have to do today? What didn't I get done yesterday? Why did I get into that disagreement? Other nights, I am on a high wire, hovering between sleep and wakefulness and chewing over my next mov...

Can relaxation drinks put you to sleep?
Once, "relaxation beverages" consisted of alcohol, chamomile tea and warm milk. Now, the field includes a slew of new drinks promising a better night's sleep using such ingredients as melatonin, valerian root and - think turkey - tryptophan.

Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?

Free app adjusts color on monitors to prevent disruption of sleep cycle
I stare at screens almost every waking hour. Computer monitor. Laptop. TV. Tablet. Smartphone. So I've tested a few ways to ease the strain on my eyes - and, in the process, learned about something that might be helping me in non-waking hours, too. It's about the light that these screens emit. It...

Obama administration unlikely to block Arizona plan to cut 250,000 from Medicaid rolls
The administration will probably permit the plan despite a provision in the new health-care law barring states from tightening their eligibility standards for the program, federal officials said.

The sports bra: Your No. 1 supporter
Everyone has a pair of feet, but women have an additional pair of something to worry about while exercising. And they're every bit as tricky to fit, control and protect, which is why bras are beginning to rival shoes as the most technical of all sporting apparel.

Z drugs keep sleep-aid market awake
With almost a third of Americans reporting sleep problems, it's not surprising that sales of Ambien, Sonata and similar sleep aids are high: It's a $1.8 billion market.

Study of recalled medical devices faults lax FDA testing methods
A new analysis is raising questions about how good a job the Food and Drug Administration is doing at protecting Americans from faulty medical devices.

Meditation and mindfulness may give your brain a boost
They are the simplest instructions in the world: Sit in a comfortable position, close your eyes, clear your mind and try to focus on the present moment. Yet I am confident that anyone who has tried meditation will agree with me that what seems so basic and easy on paper is often incredibly challe...

Humor, music and spirituality may offer physical benefits
Humor, music and spirituality can boost your mood, but growing evidence suggests that they also offer physical benefits.

Group tries to simplify drug labels to help people get the proper doses
"Take two tablets by mouth twice daily." This printed instruction, common on prescription pill bottles, might seem straightforward. Yet in a study, nearly half of patients misunderstood what it or other common label instructions meant.

Book explains allergies, asthma; magazine rates teen TV shows for safe-sex info
POZ, the lifestyle magazine for people with HIV/AIDS, evaluated a variety of teen TV shows for how often characters practiced safe sex.New book discusses allergies and asthma in children.

Apps and gadgets to track your sleep
A bunch of gadgets and apps are now on the market to help high-tech insomniacs (or just the sleep-curious) track their z's. These aren't meant to help you fall asleep, though there are plenty of other apps intended to do that. We're talking here about gizmos that claim to record your movements al...

Too little or too much sleep may take a toll on the heart
Quick Study: Too little or too much sleep may take a toll on the heart.

Tattooing outgrows its renegade image to thrive in the mainstream
It's 1945, and you want a tattoo. You drive to the part of town your mom warned you about, past scruffy bars and burlesque shows, and arrive at a tiny shop offering maybe 200 designs in three or four colors. An ex-sailor who just clocked out of his day job rinses off his tattoo machine. Five minu...

Insuring your health: Book argues against unnecessary medical intervention
In a new book, "Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health," Dartmouth researchers and physicians H. Gilbert Welch, Lisa Schwartz and Steven Woloshin argue that the medical establishment's embrace of early diagnosis and treatment as the key to keeping people healthy actually does ...

2010 was marked by a recall of eggs, drug warnings and progress on flu vaccines
Consumer Reports Insights: 2010 was marked by a recall of eggs, drug warnings and progress on flu vaccines.

Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.

FlyScreen Lands On iPhone But Not As We Know It
FlyScreen , the lock screen replacement for Android and Symbian phones from Israeli startup Cellogic, has landed on the iPhone . But not as we know it.That's because Apple's iOS is locked down as it were (see what I did there) and doesn't allow third-party apps to take over the lock screen. This...

D.C.'s leading provider of clean needles to drug addicts to close Feb. 25
The leading provider of clean needles to drug addicts in the District to help stem the spread of AIDS plans to shut its doors by the end of the month, officials said Wednesday, in the city that has the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence rate in the country.

Study: Surgery in womb helps babies with spina bifida
Performing surgery on babies with the most severe form of spina bifida when they are still in the womb doubles the chance that they will be able to walk, according to a federally funded study released Wednesday.

Breast-cancer study questions lymph node removal
Many women with early breast cancer do not appear to need removal of their lymph nodes, as is often recommended, according to a federally funded study released Tuesday.

Want to be one of the Nationals' racing presidents?
Applications are due Friday for those interested in becoming one of the Washington Nationals' racing presidents: Abe, George, Tom or Teddy, right. The mascots are starting their sixth year of entertaining home crowds with a race on the field during the fourth inning.

The February wellness checklist
February's long winter slog is brightened by Valentine's Day, a good reminder to take care of our hearts. Here are some ideas for being well during this shortest, and often snowiest, of months in Washington.


When injuries interrupt exercise: Readers weigh in
I got some great feedback on my Jan. 27 column about the sudden interruption to my running regimen, "Coping with an out-of-the-routine injury." Here are edited excerpts of what two readers had to say, followed by excerpts from an online Q&A nutritional biochemist Shawn Talbott and I did with ...

'Why We Get Fat' by Gary Taubes; teen smoking prevention online
Once more, with feeling "Why We Get Fat" (Knopf, $24.95)

Health benefits of falling and staying in love
Love may make the world go 'round, but is it powerful enough to lower one's blood pressure, reduce depression and speed the healing of an injury? With Valentine's Day just around the corner, we set out to find the answer and discovered that science says yes.

Getting a tattoo is largely safe, though experts advise using a reputable shop
Dermatologists' organizations, tattoo artists and the Food and Drug Administration agree that tattooing is largely safe, but any time you stick a needle into skin there are risks. Consumers need to do their homework.

Military personnel take extreme measures to meet body-fat and weight rules
Air Force Tech. Sgt. Heather Sommerdyke spent $12,000 on two liposuction surgeries last spring. She was running eight to 10 miles, six days a week. She even switched to a starvation diet. It was all part of a last-ditch effort to trim her waistline to the 35.5-inch maximum for female airmen. She ...

Mediation can bring justice with no need for a trial
When a health-care provider harms instead of heals, patients who seek answers and redress generally face the prospect of a long and costly lawsuit. But there's another option, one that can significantly reduce the toll of a court battle while providing many of the same benefits to patients and th...

New dietary guidelines: Eat less, eat better and lose the salt
Americans need to make big changes in their eating habits to fight the obesity epidemic and a host of ailments caused by poor diets, including consuming less sugar, fat and salt and more fish, fruits and vegetables, the Obama administration recommended Monday.

Report on global cardiac risks: World gets fatter, but blood pressure goes down
The whole world is getting fatter, except perhaps for the women of Italy and Singapore. Globally, blood pressure is slowly coming down. Cholesterol is falling in rich countries and rising in developing ones.

State officials divided on meaning of judge's health-care ruling
A day after a federal judge struck down the government's plan to overhaul the health-care system, Wisconsin Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen issued a stern statement: "This means that, for Wisconsin, the federal health care law is dead," and that his state "was relieved of any obligations or duti...

No chilling effect on donations at the Polar Bear Plunge
Much to the chagrin of the proudly purple people of Baltimore, the Ravens will not be playing in the Super Bowl on Sunday.

Super thin Super Bowl spread
Like other food-centered celebrations, Super Bowl gatherings can be both fun and fraught with apprehension for those concerned about their waistlines. Nobody wants to sit on the sidelines, skipping the traditional snacks. But who wants to deal with postgame regrets? You can work football-fan food...

Health information remains high on the list of popular uses for the Internet
Seeking health information is the third-most-prevalent activity among American Internet users, according to a report being issued Feb. 1 by the Pew Internet Project. The only things more universal were exchanging e-mail and using search engines. (Of course, if someone uses Google to look up "shin...

Liposuction can't salvage Navy career
KEY WEST, FLA. - Mick Kruger is not out of shape. The 38-year-old master-at-arms first class has never failed a physical readiness test. He routinely scores "excellent" on the mile-and-a-half run. He has run one marathon and finished three others on in-line skates. His performance evaluations du...

AnyBody: Parents are ignoring their children for their BlackBerry
Increasingly, it is adults' constant, obsessive use of these technologies that's coming under fire.

Judge strikes down entire new health-care law
A federal judge in Florida on Monday became the first to strike down the entire law to overhaul the nation's health-care system, potentially complicating implementation of the statute in the 26 states that brought the suit.

House Republicans sharpen attack on health-care reform in two Hill hearings
Republicans on Wednesday used their new majority in the House of Representatives to hold the first of what they promise will be a steady drumbeat of congressional hearings to denounce the new health-care law.

Nutritional information: Milk
Sales of whole milk in the United States made up about 70 percent of the market in the mid-1970s but have dropped dramatically since, while the sales of skim and 2 percent have risen. The most recent sales figures show:

Got milk? What kind?
After spending a day with her boyfriend's family recently, my daughter marveled, "They only drink whole milk!" That milk was delicious, she reported, even after the container had sat on the counter for a while.

U.S. recovers $4 billion from health-care fraud cases
The government recaptured a record $4 billion last year from pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, doctors, nursing homes and other providers of care that defrauded federal health-care programs, the Obama administration reported Monday.

Jan Fabre brings 'Belgian Rules' to Russia
Famous visual artist Jan Fabre presents his fresh performance 'Belgian Rules/Belgium Rules' in Moscow. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Emergency services rescue whale in Marseille harbor
Firefighters and police join forces to help 15m-long whale stranded in Vieux Port area of the city. Rough cut (no reporter narration).

Asterix joins a chariot race in 37th comic edition
Asterix, the indomitable pint-sized Gaul forever outfoxing the Romans, returns for his 37th comic adventure. Edward Baran reports.

Spanish paraglider becomes part of a natural phenomenon of starlings
Paraglider Horacio Llorens became part of a flock of starlings to embrace his dream of flying like a bird. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

A ticket with the pleb's-eye-view of the Colosseum, please!
For the first time in decades, the top floors of the Colosseum built to host gladiatorial contests nearly 2,000 years ago have opened for small groups of visitors. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Escape room has New Yorkers participate in murderous plot
A seemingly-abandoned warehouse in Brooklyn is the set of an immersive horror show featuring a murderous psychopath. Elly Park reports.

Wax Trump joins Madame Tussauds - by popular demand
A real life replica of U.S. President Donald Trump is the latest addition to Berlin's Madame Tussauds and will go on display from Oct. 20, the wax museum said on Tuesday. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

Fowl play in Florida as hen hangs ten
Standup paddleboarding is a popular pasttime in the Florida Keys - even chickens can get in on the act. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Europe's largest freshwater aquarium opens in Switzerland
It houses 10,000 fish and 100 reptiles, that are almost exclusively endangered or threatened species. Elly Park reports.

British autistic artist Stephen Wiltshire signs finished drawing of NYC skyline
Wiltshire has an eidetic memory that allows him to recall every detail of a city from one 45-minute helicopter ride. The artist says drawing the New York City skyline was "truly hard work." Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Indonesian town gives owls their jobs back
A small town in Indonesia has given owls their traditional job of pest control back - rejecting a growing trend in selling owls or 'Harry Potter Birds' as many call them. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

Brazilian goes for gold after receiving Olympiad's heart
A 67-year-old Brazilian woman has had her life changed after receiving the heart of the former coach of Germany's slalom canoe teach. Saskia O'Donoghue reports

Dutch team Nuna 9 leads 2017 Solar Challenge
Solar cars race in the World Solar Challenge through the Australian Outback. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

New exhibition explores evolution of American Tiki
New exhibition, "The Art of Tiki" explores the development of Tiki pop culture in America since it was first introduced in the 1950s. Rollo Ross reports.

Scotland’s Fraser Mann wins the World Hickory Open Golf Championship
Fraser Mann from Scotland won the World Hickory Open Golf Championship on Wednesday playing on the links course at Kilspindie Golf Club in Scotland. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

Are Sunday roast wraps heading for global success?
A family-run business in Yorkshire has found itself at the centre of an explosion in global interest after launching a new take on the traditional Sunday roast - the Yorkshire Pudding Wrap. David Doyle reports.

Researchers aim to turn bird feathers into food
Biotechnologists have identified and refined a micro-organism that can convert bird feathers and other forms of organic waste into food products and cosmetics, as Jim Drury reports.

Hundreds of sky lanterns light up Taipei
Wishful residents write messages on lanterns and send them to the sky on the day of the mid-autumn festival. Rough Cut (No reporter narration).

Is a 16th-century charcoal sketch a naked Mona Lisa?
Art experts are examining a nude sketch as the possible basis for Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa. Grace Lee reports.

New film features BASE jumper who died in crash in the Alps
BASE is the story of a wingsuit pilot, played by Italian-Norwegian Alexander Polli, whose stunts were followed by millions on social media. (Rough cut - no reporter narration)

Eiffel Tower celebrates 300 million visitors
The world's most visited monument celebrates 300 million visitors since it opened 128 years ago, with colourful lights and concerts on each floor. (Rough cut - no reporter narration)

George Harrison’s personal sitar up for auction
A sitar owned by Beatles member George Harrison and used in the recording of "Norwegian Wood" is expected to fetch between $50,000 - $100,000 in an auction. Sarah Mills reports.

Yves Saint Laurent’s original Paris atelier opens to public
Paris fashion house Yves Saint Laurent inaugurates a museum at its historic atelier, which will give visitors a chance to experience the designer's world. Sarah Mills reports.

Christie's to auction rare large diamond
The largest ever diamond to come to auction was previewed by Christie's in Hong Kong ahead of its sale in November. Saskia O'Donoghue reports

Bees invade Australian home
Thousands of bees have invaded a home near the Australian city of Newcastle and have left thick walls of honeycomb in the wall cavities, according to local media. No reporter narration.

CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section

Just as we now realize that fast food was "engineered to addict us," says author Franklin Foer, we must recognize the role that Big Tech plays in "shaping our future as a species."

One Russian-linked campaign posing as part of the Black Lives Matter movement used Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr and Pokémon Go and even contacted some reporters in an effort to exploit racial tensions and sow discord among Americans.

The Rosetta spacecraft was launched in 2004 and arrived at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on August 6, 2014, becoming the first probe to rendezvous with a comet. On November 12, Rosetta dropped its Philae lander to the comet's surface -- another first. But Philae bounced and didn't grab onto the comet in its designated landing spot. After three days, the lander's battery died and it went into hibernation. It woke up and briefly communicated with Rosetta in June and July 2015 as the comet came closer to the sun. Mission scientists weren't sure exactly where the probe had ended up. Until now.

Digital artist Jan Frojdman spent three weeks shifting through 33,000 images obtained from NASA to create this 3D model of Mars.

Members of the Cassini mission say goodbye to the spacecraft, their coworkers and some long-held traditions.

Scientists are rethinking their understanding of Jupiter's powerful auroras after receiving data from NASA's Juno spacecraft.

New technology brings objects to life on your phone.

NASA is sending OSIRIS-REx, a robotic spacecraft, to an asteroid to study its role in our universe.



It's been five years since NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover landed on the red planet on August 6, 2012. The rover survived the much-publicized "seven minutes of terror" and safely landed near Mount Sharp. The rover accomplished its main goal in less than a year, collecting a rock sample that shows ancient Mars could supported living microbes.

Japan is building the fastest supercomputer in the world
Japan is building the world's fastest supercomputer, which it hopes will make the country the new global hub for artificial intelligence research.

Ingrem, a Chinese company has created the "husband pod," an arcade booth intended to stave off boredom for men who accompany their partners to the mall.

Scientists have figured out how to grow organs from skin cells. CNN's Rachel Crane explores a lab that is using this technique to revolutionize cancer treatments.

A security robot named Steve plunged down four steps into a fountain in Washington, leading to its watery demise.

Meet GuardBot, a spherical surveillance vehicle that can swim upstream. CNN's Thom Patterson explains how the military hopes to use it.

Zero gravity, fully cute: New Japanese drone in space
The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency has released the first set of images and videos taken by its debut zero-gravity camera drone or "Int-Ball," the cute orb of a drone, will optimize communication between crew in space and on Earth.

Researchers at the University of Washington demonstrate new techniques to turn audio clips into realistic video, using clips from President Obama's speeches.

Every July, some of the world's most wealthy and powerful businesspeople meet in Sun Valley, Idaho, for an exclusive weeklong conference.

Beneath its heavy cloud cover, Jupiter has been able to keep its secrets from astronomers. Now, first results from NASA's Juno mission are challenging researchers' beliefs about the gas giant.